The endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica reprograms barley to salt-stress tolerance, disease resistance, and higher yield

Frank Waller, Beate Achatz, Helmut Baltruschat, J. Fodor, Katja Becker, Marina Fischer, Tobias Heier, Ralph Hückelhoven, Christina Neumann, Diter Von Wettstein, Philipp Franken, Karl Heinz Kogel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

620 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disease resistance strategies are powerful approaches to sustainable agriculture because they reduce chemical input into the environment. Recently, Piriformospora indica, a plant-root-colonizing basidiomycete fungus, has been discovered in the Indian Thar desert and was shown to provide strong growth-promoting activity during its symbiosis with a broad spectrum of plants [Verma, S. et al. (1998) Mycologia 90, 896-903]. Here, we report on the potential of P. indica to induce resistance to fungal diseases and tolerance to salt stress in the monocotyledonous plant barley. The beneficial effect on the defense status is detected in distal leaves, demonstrating a systemic induction of resistance by a root-endophytic fungus. The systemically altered "defense readiness" is associated with an elevated antioxidative capacity due to an activation of the glutathione-ascorbate cycle and results in an overall increase in grain yield. Because P. indica can be easily propagated in the absence of a host plant, we conclude that the fungus could be exploited to increase disease resistance and yield in crop plants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13386-13391
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume102
Issue number38
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 20 2005

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Salt-Tolerance
Disease Resistance
Hordeum
Fungi
Basidiomycota
Plant Roots
Symbiosis
Mycoses
Agriculture
Glutathione
Salts

Keywords

  • Ascorbate
  • Glutathione
  • Powdery mildew
  • Root endophyte
  • Symbiosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

The endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica reprograms barley to salt-stress tolerance, disease resistance, and higher yield. / Waller, Frank; Achatz, Beate; Baltruschat, Helmut; Fodor, J.; Becker, Katja; Fischer, Marina; Heier, Tobias; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Neumann, Christina; Von Wettstein, Diter; Franken, Philipp; Kogel, Karl Heinz.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 102, No. 38, 20.09.2005, p. 13386-13391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Waller, F, Achatz, B, Baltruschat, H, Fodor, J, Becker, K, Fischer, M, Heier, T, Hückelhoven, R, Neumann, C, Von Wettstein, D, Franken, P & Kogel, KH 2005, 'The endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica reprograms barley to salt-stress tolerance, disease resistance, and higher yield', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 102, no. 38, pp. 13386-13391. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0504423102
Waller, Frank ; Achatz, Beate ; Baltruschat, Helmut ; Fodor, J. ; Becker, Katja ; Fischer, Marina ; Heier, Tobias ; Hückelhoven, Ralph ; Neumann, Christina ; Von Wettstein, Diter ; Franken, Philipp ; Kogel, Karl Heinz. / The endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica reprograms barley to salt-stress tolerance, disease resistance, and higher yield. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2005 ; Vol. 102, No. 38. pp. 13386-13391.
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