The efficiency of multi-target drugs: The network approach might help drug design

P. Csermely, Vilmos Ágoston, Sándor Pongor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

571 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite considerable progress in genome- and proteome-based high-throughput screening methods and rational drug design, the number of successful single-target drugs did not increase appreciably during the past decade. Network models suggest that partial inhibition of a surprisingly small number of targets can be more efficient than the complete inhibition of a single target. This and the success stories of multi-target drugs and combinatorial therapies led us to suggest that systematic drug-design strategies should be directed against multiple targets. We propose that the final effect of partial, but multiple, drug actions might often surpass that of complete drug action at a single target. The future success of this novel drug-design paradigm will depend not only on a new generation of computer models to identify the correct multiple targets and their multi-fitting, low-affinity drug candidates but also on more-efficient in vivo testing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-182
Number of pages5
JournalTrends in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005

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Drug Design
Pharmaceutical Preparations
High-Throughput Screening Assays
Proteome
Computer Simulation
Genome
Drug Therapy
Screening
Genes
Throughput
Testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Toxicology

Cite this

The efficiency of multi-target drugs : The network approach might help drug design. / Csermely, P.; Ágoston, Vilmos; Pongor, Sándor.

In: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, Vol. 26, No. 4, 04.2005, p. 178-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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