The effects of various doses of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on the expression of CD63 and the release of histamine by basophils of atopic and non-atopic patients

E. Gyimesi, F. Gönczi, M. Szilasi, P. Gróf, S. Baráth, S. Sipka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We tested the effect of various doses of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) on the expression of CD63 and the in vitro release of histamine by basophils stimulated with ragweed allergen in patients with or without ragweed and mite allergies. Methods: The peripheral blood of 11 patients with ragweed allergy, 10 patients with mite allergy and 14 control patients was incubated with ragweed allergen extract following pretreatment with varying doses of LPS. The expression of CD63 in basophils was measured by flow cytometry, and the release of histamine was determined by ELISA. Results: In the samples of patients with ragweed allergy that were exposed to specific allergen, only high doses of LPS significantly elevated the expression of CD63 (200 ng/ml; 1,000 EU/ml) and the release of histamine (2,000 ng/ml; 10,000 EU/ml). There was no effect of LPS in any other cases. Conclusions: Bacterial LPS (endotoxin) concentrations higher than 200 ng/ml (1,000 EU/ml), which rarely occurs in nature, could only activate the basophils from atopic patients whilst in the presence of the specific allergen. Thus, the restoration of the urban, "microbe-poor" milieu with endotoxin (as LPS) can be a promising and harmless approach for allergy prevention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-218
Number of pages6
JournalInflammation Research
Volume62
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

Basophils
Histamine Release
Ambrosia
Lipopolysaccharides
Hypersensitivity
Allergens
Endotoxins
Mites
Flow Cytometry
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

Keywords

  • Atopic allergy
  • Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin)
  • CD63
  • Histamine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Immunology

Cite this

@article{243707421f994cf68c477a8b6309ec3d,
title = "The effects of various doses of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on the expression of CD63 and the release of histamine by basophils of atopic and non-atopic patients",
abstract = "Objective: We tested the effect of various doses of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) on the expression of CD63 and the in vitro release of histamine by basophils stimulated with ragweed allergen in patients with or without ragweed and mite allergies. Methods: The peripheral blood of 11 patients with ragweed allergy, 10 patients with mite allergy and 14 control patients was incubated with ragweed allergen extract following pretreatment with varying doses of LPS. The expression of CD63 in basophils was measured by flow cytometry, and the release of histamine was determined by ELISA. Results: In the samples of patients with ragweed allergy that were exposed to specific allergen, only high doses of LPS significantly elevated the expression of CD63 (200 ng/ml; 1,000 EU/ml) and the release of histamine (2,000 ng/ml; 10,000 EU/ml). There was no effect of LPS in any other cases. Conclusions: Bacterial LPS (endotoxin) concentrations higher than 200 ng/ml (1,000 EU/ml), which rarely occurs in nature, could only activate the basophils from atopic patients whilst in the presence of the specific allergen. Thus, the restoration of the urban, {"}microbe-poor{"} milieu with endotoxin (as LPS) can be a promising and harmless approach for allergy prevention.",
keywords = "Atopic allergy, Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin), CD63, Histamine",
author = "E. Gyimesi and F. G{\"o}nczi and M. Szilasi and P. Gr{\'o}f and S. Bar{\'a}th and S. Sipka",
year = "2013",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1007/s00011-012-0569-9",
language = "English",
volume = "62",
pages = "213--218",
journal = "Inflammation Research",
issn = "1023-3830",
publisher = "Birkhauser Verlag Basel",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of various doses of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on the expression of CD63 and the release of histamine by basophils of atopic and non-atopic patients

AU - Gyimesi, E.

AU - Gönczi, F.

AU - Szilasi, M.

AU - Gróf, P.

AU - Baráth, S.

AU - Sipka, S.

PY - 2013/2

Y1 - 2013/2

N2 - Objective: We tested the effect of various doses of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) on the expression of CD63 and the in vitro release of histamine by basophils stimulated with ragweed allergen in patients with or without ragweed and mite allergies. Methods: The peripheral blood of 11 patients with ragweed allergy, 10 patients with mite allergy and 14 control patients was incubated with ragweed allergen extract following pretreatment with varying doses of LPS. The expression of CD63 in basophils was measured by flow cytometry, and the release of histamine was determined by ELISA. Results: In the samples of patients with ragweed allergy that were exposed to specific allergen, only high doses of LPS significantly elevated the expression of CD63 (200 ng/ml; 1,000 EU/ml) and the release of histamine (2,000 ng/ml; 10,000 EU/ml). There was no effect of LPS in any other cases. Conclusions: Bacterial LPS (endotoxin) concentrations higher than 200 ng/ml (1,000 EU/ml), which rarely occurs in nature, could only activate the basophils from atopic patients whilst in the presence of the specific allergen. Thus, the restoration of the urban, "microbe-poor" milieu with endotoxin (as LPS) can be a promising and harmless approach for allergy prevention.

AB - Objective: We tested the effect of various doses of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) on the expression of CD63 and the in vitro release of histamine by basophils stimulated with ragweed allergen in patients with or without ragweed and mite allergies. Methods: The peripheral blood of 11 patients with ragweed allergy, 10 patients with mite allergy and 14 control patients was incubated with ragweed allergen extract following pretreatment with varying doses of LPS. The expression of CD63 in basophils was measured by flow cytometry, and the release of histamine was determined by ELISA. Results: In the samples of patients with ragweed allergy that were exposed to specific allergen, only high doses of LPS significantly elevated the expression of CD63 (200 ng/ml; 1,000 EU/ml) and the release of histamine (2,000 ng/ml; 10,000 EU/ml). There was no effect of LPS in any other cases. Conclusions: Bacterial LPS (endotoxin) concentrations higher than 200 ng/ml (1,000 EU/ml), which rarely occurs in nature, could only activate the basophils from atopic patients whilst in the presence of the specific allergen. Thus, the restoration of the urban, "microbe-poor" milieu with endotoxin (as LPS) can be a promising and harmless approach for allergy prevention.

KW - Atopic allergy

KW - Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin)

KW - CD63

KW - Histamine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84873736139&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84873736139&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00011-012-0569-9

DO - 10.1007/s00011-012-0569-9

M3 - Article

VL - 62

SP - 213

EP - 218

JO - Inflammation Research

JF - Inflammation Research

SN - 1023-3830

IS - 2

ER -