The effects of using different species conservation priority lists on the evaluation of habitat importance within Hungarian grasslands

P. Batáry, András BáldiI, Sarolta Erdos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many bird species of conservation importance inhabit the grasslands of the Hungarian Great Plain. Although extensive grazing management usually supports more bird species than intensive management, the conservation priority is to protect rare or declining species. Therefore, the conservation status of species must also be included in assessments of the value of different habitats. We used territory mapping to count birds in 21 extensively and intensively grazed field pairs on the Hungarian Great Plain, and subsequently adjusted site scores depending on which species appeared on various lists of priority taxa. We investigated differences in conservation scores of two global conservation lists (the Bonn Convention and another based on values of eight biological characteristics), two West Europe based lists (Bird Directive and CORINE), three continental lists (European Threat Status, SPEC and Bern Convention) and two Hungarian lists (protected species of Hungary and an alternative based on the specifics of Hungarian populations). Extensively managed fields had higher conservation values under seven of the nine priority lists: only the two West Europe based lists showed opposite trends in more than half the study areas. Since both West Europe based lists cover many central and eastern European countries, there is an urgent need to revise these lists, especially the Bird Directive list that gives serious legal responsibilities to countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-43
Number of pages9
JournalBird Conservation International
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2007

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species conservation
grasslands
grassland
birds
habitat
habitats
bird
protected species
grazing management
biological characteristics
Eastern European region
conservation status
Central European region
Hungary
effect
evaluation
Europe

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology

Cite this

The effects of using different species conservation priority lists on the evaluation of habitat importance within Hungarian grasslands. / Batáry, P.; BáldiI, András; Erdos, Sarolta.

In: Bird Conservation International, Vol. 17, No. 1, 03.2007, p. 35-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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