The effects of short-term immobilization stress on muscarinic receptors, β-adrenoceptors, and adenylyl cyclase in different heart regions

Jaromír Mysliveček, Jan Říčný, M. Palkóvits, Richard Kvetňanský

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Heart muscarinic receptors (MR) and β-adrenoceptors (BAR) belong to a large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Although the role of catecholamines in the stress has been under keen investigation for many years, the effects of immobilization on this pair of receptors, considering their almost completely opposite actions in the heart, are not yet known. We have studied the effects of short-term immobilization (for 120 min) with different times of decapitation after the end of the immobilization period (0, 3, and 24 h) on MR, BAR (β1-AR and β2-AR using radioligand binding studies), and adenylyl cyclase (AC; using high-pressure liquid chromatography detection of cAMP) in different heart regions (left and right atria with or without cardiac ganglion cells [auriculae], septum, and left and right ventricles). The effects of one immobilization period were first apparent after 24 h. Stress brought about a downregulation of MR and BAR with decrease in AC activity. These effects were regionally specific and were predominantly expressed in the right atria, which is rich in ganglia cells, and in the right ventricles. Our results indicate that stressful stimuli can influence not only BAR, but MR, and that AC activity can also be affected. This finding is in good agreement with our previous hypothesis that parallel changes are possible in the number of this pair of receptors on cell membranes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)315-322
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Muscarinic Receptors
Adenylyl Cyclases
Immobilization
Adrenergic Receptors
Heart Atria
Heart Ventricles
Ganglia
High pressure liquid chromatography
Decapitation
Cell membranes
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
Catecholamines
Down-Regulation
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Cell Membrane
Cells

Keywords

  • β-adrenoceptors
  • Adenylyl cyclase
  • Heart
  • Immobilization stress
  • Muscarinic receptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

The effects of short-term immobilization stress on muscarinic receptors, β-adrenoceptors, and adenylyl cyclase in different heart regions. / Mysliveček, Jaromír; Říčný, Jan; Palkóvits, M.; Kvetňanský, Richard.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1018, 2004, p. 315-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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