The effects of selective brain hypothermia on intracerebral hemorrhage in rats

Matthew Fingas, D. Clark, Frederick Colbourne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prolonged hypothermia effectively treats global cerebral ischemic injury in animal models as well as in cardiac arrest victims. Furthermore, clinical trials, based upon encouraging animal findings, are underway to assess efficacy in ischemic stroke. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a more devastating stroke, but one that shares mechanisms of injury with ischemia. Accordingly, ICH may be amenable to hypothermia treatment. In this study we tested whether selective brain hypothermia improves outcome after an ICH in rats created by infusing 100 μL of autologous whole blood into the striatum. Striatal hypothermia (∼ 32 °C) was induced with a novel method (implanted cooling coil) that does not cause systemic cooling, thereby providing a safer and potentially more effective treatment for stroke than systemic hypothermia. Edema occurred for 4 days after ICH, but it peaked at 3 days (∼ 5%). At this time it was significantly reduced (to ∼ 2%) by cooling starting 1 h after ICH (3 day duration). Next, we determined whether 1 and 12 h delayed cooling treatments (4 day duration) would lessen functional impairment and lesion size. Untreated (normothermic) ICH resulted in significant forelimb use asymmetry, as well as deficits in walking and skilled reaching. These deficits were unaffected by hypothermia, as was the volume of tissue lost (∼ 20 mm3) at 1 month. Thus, attenuated edema did not result in behavioral or histological benefit. In conclusion, while additional research with alternative cooling protocols and ICH models are required, these findings suggest that while hypothermia lessens edema, it will not be directly neuroprotective after ICH.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-284
Number of pages8
JournalExperimental Neurology
Volume208
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007

Fingerprint

Cerebral Hemorrhage
Hypothermia
Brain
Edema
Stroke
Corpus Striatum
Forelimb
Wounds and Injuries
Heart Arrest
Walking
Ischemia
Animal Models
Clinical Trials
Research

Keywords

  • Edema
  • Focal hypothermia
  • Intracerebral hemorrhage
  • Neuroprotection
  • Recovery of function
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The effects of selective brain hypothermia on intracerebral hemorrhage in rats. / Fingas, Matthew; Clark, D.; Colbourne, Frederick.

In: Experimental Neurology, Vol. 208, No. 2, 12.2007, p. 277-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fingas, Matthew ; Clark, D. ; Colbourne, Frederick. / The effects of selective brain hypothermia on intracerebral hemorrhage in rats. In: Experimental Neurology. 2007 ; Vol. 208, No. 2. pp. 277-284.
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