The effects of rhythm and melody on auditory stream segregation

Orsolya Szalárdy, Alexandra Bendixen, Tamás M. Böhm, Lucy A. Davies, Susan L. Denham, I. Winkler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While many studies have assessed the efficacy of similarity-based cues for auditory stream segregation, much less is known about whether and how the larger-scale structure of sound sequences support stream formation and the choice of sound organization. Two experiments investigated the effects of musical melody and rhythm on the segregation of two interleaved tone sequences. The two sets of tones fully overlapped in pitch range but differed from each other in interaural time and intensity. Unbeknownst to the listener, separately, each of the interleaved sequences was created from the notes of a different song. In different experimental conditions, the notes and/or their timing could either follow those of the songs or they could be scrambled or, in case of timing, set to be isochronous. Listeners were asked to continuously report whether they heard a single coherent sequence (integrated) or two concurrent streams (segregated). Although temporal overlap between tones from the two streams proved to be the strongest cue for stream segregation, significant effects of tonality and familiarity with the songs were also observed. These results suggest that the regular temporal patterns are utilized as cues in auditory stream segregation and that long-term memory is involved in this process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1392-1405
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume135
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

rhythm
cues
time measurement
acoustics
Segregation
Melody
Rhythm
Hearing
Song
Sound
Listeners

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The effects of rhythm and melody on auditory stream segregation. / Szalárdy, Orsolya; Bendixen, Alexandra; Böhm, Tamás M.; Davies, Lucy A.; Denham, Susan L.; Winkler, I.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 135, No. 3, 2014, p. 1392-1405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szalárdy, O, Bendixen, A, Böhm, TM, Davies, LA, Denham, SL & Winkler, I 2014, 'The effects of rhythm and melody on auditory stream segregation', Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 135, no. 3, pp. 1392-1405. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4865196
Szalárdy, Orsolya ; Bendixen, Alexandra ; Böhm, Tamás M. ; Davies, Lucy A. ; Denham, Susan L. ; Winkler, I. / The effects of rhythm and melody on auditory stream segregation. In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2014 ; Vol. 135, No. 3. pp. 1392-1405.
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