The effects of reward and punishment contingencies on decision-making in multiple sclerosis

Helga Nagy, K. Bencsik, Cecília Rajda, K. Benedek, Sándor Beniczky, S. Kéri, L. Vécsei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) show cognitive and emotional disorders. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of contingency learning in decision-making in young, non-depressed, highly functioning patients with MS (n = 21) and in matched healthy controls (n = 30). Executive functions, attention, short-term memory, speed of information processing, and selection and retrieval of linguistic material were also investigated. Contingency learning based on the cumulative effect of reward and punishment was assessed using the Iowa Gambling Test (IGT). In the classic ABCD version of the IGT, advantageous decks are characterized by immediate small reward but even smaller future punishment. In the modified EFGH version, advantageous decks are characterized by immediate large punishment but even larger future reward. Results revealed that patients with MS showed significant dysfunctions in both versions of the IGT. Performances on neuropsychological tests sensitive to dorsolateral prefrontal functions did not predict and did not correlate with the IGT scores. These results suggest that patients with MS show impaired performances on tasks designed to assess decision-making in a situation requiring the evaluation of long-term outcomes regardless of gain or loss, and that this deficit is not a pure consequence of executive dysfunctions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)559-565
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2006

Fingerprint

Gambling
Punishment
Reward
Multiple Sclerosis
Decision Making
Learning
Neuropsychological Tests
Information Storage and Retrieval
Executive Function
Task Performance and Analysis
Linguistics
Automatic Data Processing
Short-Term Memory

Keywords

  • Demyelinating diseases
  • Emotion
  • Executive functions
  • Iowa Gambling Test
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

The effects of reward and punishment contingencies on decision-making in multiple sclerosis. / Nagy, Helga; Bencsik, K.; Rajda, Cecília; Benedek, K.; Beniczky, Sándor; Kéri, S.; Vécsei, L.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 12, No. 4, 07.2006, p. 559-565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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