The effect of reward-handler dissociation on dogs' obedience performance in different conditions

Linda Gerencsér, A. Kosztolányi, Joni Delanoeije, A. Miklósi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dogs' responsiveness to instructions of the handler is known to be influenced by several factors. In this study we examined whether reward-handler dissociation has an effect on the obedience performance of family dogs with basic training history. We looked at situations involving human-dog interactions under controlled laboratory settings by measuring dogs' obedience performance to two known commands ('sit' and 'down') in several different conditions. For two different groups of dogs, we manipulated the source of the food reward: it was provided either by the handler or by a remote controlled food dispenser device during a practising period, when the handler stood in the dog's close vicinity (0.5. m). In three different test conditions the position of the handler was manipulated: he/she stood further away (3. m) from the dog either beside a screen, hid behind the screen or was outside of the room. No food reward was provided during the test trials, which were interrupted by so called reminder sessions, where dog-handler dyads practiced both commands in close vicinity to each other and food reward was also involved. We found that the performance of dogs that experienced receiving food reward from the handler was significantly poorer during the test conditions, i.e. in contexts with increased distance between them and the handler (including handler out of sight), as compared to their performance during the reminder sessions in the handlers' close vicinity. Experience with receiving food reward form the dispenser device lessened the difference in dogs' obedience between the test conditions and reminder sessions, and moreover, it also revealed a more prompt response to the 'sit' than to the 'down' commands. Thus our results show that reward-handler dissociation seems to affect dogs' obedience performance in the investigated conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-110
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Animal Behaviour Science
Volume174
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Reward
Dogs
dogs
Food
dispensers
testing
hides and skins
Canidae
Equipment and Supplies
History
history

Keywords

  • Behaviour
  • Dog
  • Food reward
  • Obedience
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Food Animals

Cite this

The effect of reward-handler dissociation on dogs' obedience performance in different conditions. / Gerencsér, Linda; Kosztolányi, A.; Delanoeije, Joni; Miklósi, A.

In: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, Vol. 174, 01.01.2016, p. 103-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4b24d6b80d8e40a7a3b26230abe58b0e,
title = "The effect of reward-handler dissociation on dogs' obedience performance in different conditions",
abstract = "Dogs' responsiveness to instructions of the handler is known to be influenced by several factors. In this study we examined whether reward-handler dissociation has an effect on the obedience performance of family dogs with basic training history. We looked at situations involving human-dog interactions under controlled laboratory settings by measuring dogs' obedience performance to two known commands ('sit' and 'down') in several different conditions. For two different groups of dogs, we manipulated the source of the food reward: it was provided either by the handler or by a remote controlled food dispenser device during a practising period, when the handler stood in the dog's close vicinity (0.5. m). In three different test conditions the position of the handler was manipulated: he/she stood further away (3. m) from the dog either beside a screen, hid behind the screen or was outside of the room. No food reward was provided during the test trials, which were interrupted by so called reminder sessions, where dog-handler dyads practiced both commands in close vicinity to each other and food reward was also involved. We found that the performance of dogs that experienced receiving food reward from the handler was significantly poorer during the test conditions, i.e. in contexts with increased distance between them and the handler (including handler out of sight), as compared to their performance during the reminder sessions in the handlers' close vicinity. Experience with receiving food reward form the dispenser device lessened the difference in dogs' obedience between the test conditions and reminder sessions, and moreover, it also revealed a more prompt response to the 'sit' than to the 'down' commands. Thus our results show that reward-handler dissociation seems to affect dogs' obedience performance in the investigated conditions.",
keywords = "Behaviour, Dog, Food reward, Obedience, Training",
author = "Linda Gerencs{\'e}r and A. Kosztol{\'a}nyi and Joni Delanoeije and A. Mikl{\'o}si",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.applanim.2015.11.009",
language = "English",
volume = "174",
pages = "103--110",
journal = "Applied Animal Behaviour Science",
issn = "0168-1591",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of reward-handler dissociation on dogs' obedience performance in different conditions

AU - Gerencsér, Linda

AU - Kosztolányi, A.

AU - Delanoeije, Joni

AU - Miklósi, A.

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Dogs' responsiveness to instructions of the handler is known to be influenced by several factors. In this study we examined whether reward-handler dissociation has an effect on the obedience performance of family dogs with basic training history. We looked at situations involving human-dog interactions under controlled laboratory settings by measuring dogs' obedience performance to two known commands ('sit' and 'down') in several different conditions. For two different groups of dogs, we manipulated the source of the food reward: it was provided either by the handler or by a remote controlled food dispenser device during a practising period, when the handler stood in the dog's close vicinity (0.5. m). In three different test conditions the position of the handler was manipulated: he/she stood further away (3. m) from the dog either beside a screen, hid behind the screen or was outside of the room. No food reward was provided during the test trials, which were interrupted by so called reminder sessions, where dog-handler dyads practiced both commands in close vicinity to each other and food reward was also involved. We found that the performance of dogs that experienced receiving food reward from the handler was significantly poorer during the test conditions, i.e. in contexts with increased distance between them and the handler (including handler out of sight), as compared to their performance during the reminder sessions in the handlers' close vicinity. Experience with receiving food reward form the dispenser device lessened the difference in dogs' obedience between the test conditions and reminder sessions, and moreover, it also revealed a more prompt response to the 'sit' than to the 'down' commands. Thus our results show that reward-handler dissociation seems to affect dogs' obedience performance in the investigated conditions.

AB - Dogs' responsiveness to instructions of the handler is known to be influenced by several factors. In this study we examined whether reward-handler dissociation has an effect on the obedience performance of family dogs with basic training history. We looked at situations involving human-dog interactions under controlled laboratory settings by measuring dogs' obedience performance to two known commands ('sit' and 'down') in several different conditions. For two different groups of dogs, we manipulated the source of the food reward: it was provided either by the handler or by a remote controlled food dispenser device during a practising period, when the handler stood in the dog's close vicinity (0.5. m). In three different test conditions the position of the handler was manipulated: he/she stood further away (3. m) from the dog either beside a screen, hid behind the screen or was outside of the room. No food reward was provided during the test trials, which were interrupted by so called reminder sessions, where dog-handler dyads practiced both commands in close vicinity to each other and food reward was also involved. We found that the performance of dogs that experienced receiving food reward from the handler was significantly poorer during the test conditions, i.e. in contexts with increased distance between them and the handler (including handler out of sight), as compared to their performance during the reminder sessions in the handlers' close vicinity. Experience with receiving food reward form the dispenser device lessened the difference in dogs' obedience between the test conditions and reminder sessions, and moreover, it also revealed a more prompt response to the 'sit' than to the 'down' commands. Thus our results show that reward-handler dissociation seems to affect dogs' obedience performance in the investigated conditions.

KW - Behaviour

KW - Dog

KW - Food reward

KW - Obedience

KW - Training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84952636806&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84952636806&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.applanim.2015.11.009

DO - 10.1016/j.applanim.2015.11.009

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84952636806

VL - 174

SP - 103

EP - 110

JO - Applied Animal Behaviour Science

JF - Applied Animal Behaviour Science

SN - 0168-1591

ER -