The Effect of Passive Movement for Paretic Ankle-Foot and Brain Activity in Post-Stroke Patients

Csilla Vér, M. Emri, Tamás Spisák, Ervin Berényi, Kázmér Kovács, Péter Katona, L. Balkay, László Menyhárt, László Kardos, L. Csiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This study aims at investigating the short-term efficacy of the continuous passive motion (CPM) device developed for the therapy of ankle-foot paresis and to investigate by fMRI the blood oxygen level-dependent responses (BOLD) during ankle passive movement (PM). Methods: Sixty-four stroke patients were investigated. Patients were assigned into 2 groups: 49 patients received both 15 min manual and 30 min device therapy (M + D), while the other group (n = 15) received only 15 min manual therapy (M). A third group of stroke patients (n = 12) was investigated by fMRI before and immediately after 30 min CPM device therapy. There was no direct relation between the fMRI group and the other 2 groups. All subjects were assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and a goniometer. Results: Mean MAS decreased, the ankle's mean plantar flexion and dorsiflexion passive range of motion (PROM) increased and the equinovalgus improved significantly in the M + D group. In the fMRI group, the PM of the paretic ankle increased BOLD responses; this was observed in the contralateral pre- and postcentral gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, central opercular cortex, and in the ipsilateral postcentral gyrus, frontal operculum cortex and cerebellum. Conclusion: Manual therapy with CPM device therapy improved the ankle PROM, equinovalgus and severity of spasticity. The ankle PM increased ipsi- and contralateral cortical activation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)132-142
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Neurology
Volume76
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

Ankle
Foot
Stroke
Continuous Passive Motion Therapy
Brain
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Musculoskeletal Manipulations
Equipment and Supplies
Somatosensory Cortex
Articular Range of Motion
Oxygen
Frontal Lobe
Paresis
Temporal Lobe
Cerebellum
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Ankle
  • Equinovalgus
  • fMRI
  • Passive movement
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The Effect of Passive Movement for Paretic Ankle-Foot and Brain Activity in Post-Stroke Patients. / Vér, Csilla; Emri, M.; Spisák, Tamás; Berényi, Ervin; Kovács, Kázmér; Katona, Péter; Balkay, L.; Menyhárt, László; Kardos, László; Csiba, L.

In: European Neurology, Vol. 76, No. 3-4, 01.10.2016, p. 132-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vér, C, Emri, M, Spisák, T, Berényi, E, Kovács, K, Katona, P, Balkay, L, Menyhárt, L, Kardos, L & Csiba, L 2016, 'The Effect of Passive Movement for Paretic Ankle-Foot and Brain Activity in Post-Stroke Patients', European Neurology, vol. 76, no. 3-4, pp. 132-142. https://doi.org/10.1159/000448033
Vér, Csilla ; Emri, M. ; Spisák, Tamás ; Berényi, Ervin ; Kovács, Kázmér ; Katona, Péter ; Balkay, L. ; Menyhárt, László ; Kardos, László ; Csiba, L. / The Effect of Passive Movement for Paretic Ankle-Foot and Brain Activity in Post-Stroke Patients. In: European Neurology. 2016 ; Vol. 76, No. 3-4. pp. 132-142.
@article{b6468fc32cb746cab49206d657dc8239,
title = "The Effect of Passive Movement for Paretic Ankle-Foot and Brain Activity in Post-Stroke Patients",
abstract = "Background: This study aims at investigating the short-term efficacy of the continuous passive motion (CPM) device developed for the therapy of ankle-foot paresis and to investigate by fMRI the blood oxygen level-dependent responses (BOLD) during ankle passive movement (PM). Methods: Sixty-four stroke patients were investigated. Patients were assigned into 2 groups: 49 patients received both 15 min manual and 30 min device therapy (M + D), while the other group (n = 15) received only 15 min manual therapy (M). A third group of stroke patients (n = 12) was investigated by fMRI before and immediately after 30 min CPM device therapy. There was no direct relation between the fMRI group and the other 2 groups. All subjects were assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and a goniometer. Results: Mean MAS decreased, the ankle's mean plantar flexion and dorsiflexion passive range of motion (PROM) increased and the equinovalgus improved significantly in the M + D group. In the fMRI group, the PM of the paretic ankle increased BOLD responses; this was observed in the contralateral pre- and postcentral gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, central opercular cortex, and in the ipsilateral postcentral gyrus, frontal operculum cortex and cerebellum. Conclusion: Manual therapy with CPM device therapy improved the ankle PROM, equinovalgus and severity of spasticity. The ankle PM increased ipsi- and contralateral cortical activation.",
keywords = "Ankle, Equinovalgus, fMRI, Passive movement, Stroke",
author = "Csilla V{\'e}r and M. Emri and Tam{\'a}s Spis{\'a}k and Ervin Ber{\'e}nyi and K{\'a}zm{\'e}r Kov{\'a}cs and P{\'e}ter Katona and L. Balkay and L{\'a}szl{\'o} Menyh{\'a}rt and L{\'a}szl{\'o} Kardos and L. Csiba",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1159/000448033",
language = "English",
volume = "76",
pages = "132--142",
journal = "European Neurology",
issn = "0014-3022",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",
number = "3-4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Effect of Passive Movement for Paretic Ankle-Foot and Brain Activity in Post-Stroke Patients

AU - Vér, Csilla

AU - Emri, M.

AU - Spisák, Tamás

AU - Berényi, Ervin

AU - Kovács, Kázmér

AU - Katona, Péter

AU - Balkay, L.

AU - Menyhárt, László

AU - Kardos, László

AU - Csiba, L.

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - Background: This study aims at investigating the short-term efficacy of the continuous passive motion (CPM) device developed for the therapy of ankle-foot paresis and to investigate by fMRI the blood oxygen level-dependent responses (BOLD) during ankle passive movement (PM). Methods: Sixty-four stroke patients were investigated. Patients were assigned into 2 groups: 49 patients received both 15 min manual and 30 min device therapy (M + D), while the other group (n = 15) received only 15 min manual therapy (M). A third group of stroke patients (n = 12) was investigated by fMRI before and immediately after 30 min CPM device therapy. There was no direct relation between the fMRI group and the other 2 groups. All subjects were assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and a goniometer. Results: Mean MAS decreased, the ankle's mean plantar flexion and dorsiflexion passive range of motion (PROM) increased and the equinovalgus improved significantly in the M + D group. In the fMRI group, the PM of the paretic ankle increased BOLD responses; this was observed in the contralateral pre- and postcentral gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, central opercular cortex, and in the ipsilateral postcentral gyrus, frontal operculum cortex and cerebellum. Conclusion: Manual therapy with CPM device therapy improved the ankle PROM, equinovalgus and severity of spasticity. The ankle PM increased ipsi- and contralateral cortical activation.

AB - Background: This study aims at investigating the short-term efficacy of the continuous passive motion (CPM) device developed for the therapy of ankle-foot paresis and to investigate by fMRI the blood oxygen level-dependent responses (BOLD) during ankle passive movement (PM). Methods: Sixty-four stroke patients were investigated. Patients were assigned into 2 groups: 49 patients received both 15 min manual and 30 min device therapy (M + D), while the other group (n = 15) received only 15 min manual therapy (M). A third group of stroke patients (n = 12) was investigated by fMRI before and immediately after 30 min CPM device therapy. There was no direct relation between the fMRI group and the other 2 groups. All subjects were assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and a goniometer. Results: Mean MAS decreased, the ankle's mean plantar flexion and dorsiflexion passive range of motion (PROM) increased and the equinovalgus improved significantly in the M + D group. In the fMRI group, the PM of the paretic ankle increased BOLD responses; this was observed in the contralateral pre- and postcentral gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, central opercular cortex, and in the ipsilateral postcentral gyrus, frontal operculum cortex and cerebellum. Conclusion: Manual therapy with CPM device therapy improved the ankle PROM, equinovalgus and severity of spasticity. The ankle PM increased ipsi- and contralateral cortical activation.

KW - Ankle

KW - Equinovalgus

KW - fMRI

KW - Passive movement

KW - Stroke

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84991728645&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84991728645&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000448033

DO - 10.1159/000448033

M3 - Article

VL - 76

SP - 132

EP - 142

JO - European Neurology

JF - European Neurology

SN - 0014-3022

IS - 3-4

ER -