The effect of nalbuphine and droperidol on spontaneous movements during induction of anesthesia with propofol in children

Alain Borgeat, Thomas Fuchs, Oliver Wilder-Smith, E. Tassonyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective: To investigate the effects of droperidol and nalbuphine on spontaneous movements during induction of anesthesia with propofol in children. Design: Randomized, double-blind study. Setting: Inpatient ear, nose, and throat (ENT) surgical clinic at the University Hospital of Geneva. Patients: Forty-five children, ages 4 to 12 years, undergoing routine elective ENT surgery. Interventions: Children were randomly assigned to receive either nalbuphine 0.1 mg/kg, droperidol 0.025 mg/kg, or isotonic saline 3 minutes before anesthesia induction. Induction was performed with a loading dose of propofol 3 mg/kg. Measurements and Main Results: Spontaneous movements were observed in 33%, 87%, and 100% of patients in the nalbuphine, droperidol, and control groups, respectively. The movements were dystonic and choreiform in nature and were similar in all three groups. The frequency of spontaneous movements was significantly reduced (p <0.05) in the nalbuphine group as compared with the droperidol and control groups. Conclusions: Nalbuphine, but not droperidol, decreases the frequency of spontaneous movements induced by propofol during induction of anesthesia in children; neither quality of induction and recovery nor interval between the end of propofol administration and tracheal extubation were modified by nalbuphine as compared with the control group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-15
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Anesthesia
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Nalbuphine
Droperidol
Propofol
Anesthesia
Pharynx
Nose
Control Groups
Ear
Airway Extubation
Double-Blind Method
Inpatients

Keywords

  • Anesthesia, induction of
  • anesthetics, intravenous-propofol
  • complications-spontaneous movement
  • droperidol
  • nalbuphine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

The effect of nalbuphine and droperidol on spontaneous movements during induction of anesthesia with propofol in children. / Borgeat, Alain; Fuchs, Thomas; Wilder-Smith, Oliver; Tassonyi, E.

In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, Vol. 5, No. 1, 1993, p. 12-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Study Objective: To investigate the effects of droperidol and nalbuphine on spontaneous movements during induction of anesthesia with propofol in children. Design: Randomized, double-blind study. Setting: Inpatient ear, nose, and throat (ENT) surgical clinic at the University Hospital of Geneva. Patients: Forty-five children, ages 4 to 12 years, undergoing routine elective ENT surgery. Interventions: Children were randomly assigned to receive either nalbuphine 0.1 mg/kg, droperidol 0.025 mg/kg, or isotonic saline 3 minutes before anesthesia induction. Induction was performed with a loading dose of propofol 3 mg/kg. Measurements and Main Results: Spontaneous movements were observed in 33{\%}, 87{\%}, and 100{\%} of patients in the nalbuphine, droperidol, and control groups, respectively. The movements were dystonic and choreiform in nature and were similar in all three groups. The frequency of spontaneous movements was significantly reduced (p <0.05) in the nalbuphine group as compared with the droperidol and control groups. Conclusions: Nalbuphine, but not droperidol, decreases the frequency of spontaneous movements induced by propofol during induction of anesthesia in children; neither quality of induction and recovery nor interval between the end of propofol administration and tracheal extubation were modified by nalbuphine as compared with the control group.",
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N2 - Study Objective: To investigate the effects of droperidol and nalbuphine on spontaneous movements during induction of anesthesia with propofol in children. Design: Randomized, double-blind study. Setting: Inpatient ear, nose, and throat (ENT) surgical clinic at the University Hospital of Geneva. Patients: Forty-five children, ages 4 to 12 years, undergoing routine elective ENT surgery. Interventions: Children were randomly assigned to receive either nalbuphine 0.1 mg/kg, droperidol 0.025 mg/kg, or isotonic saline 3 minutes before anesthesia induction. Induction was performed with a loading dose of propofol 3 mg/kg. Measurements and Main Results: Spontaneous movements were observed in 33%, 87%, and 100% of patients in the nalbuphine, droperidol, and control groups, respectively. The movements were dystonic and choreiform in nature and were similar in all three groups. The frequency of spontaneous movements was significantly reduced (p <0.05) in the nalbuphine group as compared with the droperidol and control groups. Conclusions: Nalbuphine, but not droperidol, decreases the frequency of spontaneous movements induced by propofol during induction of anesthesia in children; neither quality of induction and recovery nor interval between the end of propofol administration and tracheal extubation were modified by nalbuphine as compared with the control group.

AB - Study Objective: To investigate the effects of droperidol and nalbuphine on spontaneous movements during induction of anesthesia with propofol in children. Design: Randomized, double-blind study. Setting: Inpatient ear, nose, and throat (ENT) surgical clinic at the University Hospital of Geneva. Patients: Forty-five children, ages 4 to 12 years, undergoing routine elective ENT surgery. Interventions: Children were randomly assigned to receive either nalbuphine 0.1 mg/kg, droperidol 0.025 mg/kg, or isotonic saline 3 minutes before anesthesia induction. Induction was performed with a loading dose of propofol 3 mg/kg. Measurements and Main Results: Spontaneous movements were observed in 33%, 87%, and 100% of patients in the nalbuphine, droperidol, and control groups, respectively. The movements were dystonic and choreiform in nature and were similar in all three groups. The frequency of spontaneous movements was significantly reduced (p <0.05) in the nalbuphine group as compared with the droperidol and control groups. Conclusions: Nalbuphine, but not droperidol, decreases the frequency of spontaneous movements induced by propofol during induction of anesthesia in children; neither quality of induction and recovery nor interval between the end of propofol administration and tracheal extubation were modified by nalbuphine as compared with the control group.

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