The effect of morphological variability on surface deposition densities of inhaled particles in human bronchial and acinar airways

Werner Hofmann, Renate Winkler-Heil, I. Balásházy

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22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deposition fractions in human airway generations were computed with a stochastic deposition model, which is based on a randomly, asymmetrically dividing lung morphology, applying Monte Carlo techniques. Corresponding uncorrelated surface deposition densities were obtained by dividing the average deposition fraction in a given generation by the average total surface area of that generation. In order to consider the statistical correlation between deposition probability and linear airway dimensions in each airway, correlated surface deposition densities were calculated by dividing the deposition fraction in a randomly selected bronchial or acinar airway by the surface area of that airway and by the total number of bronchial or acinar airways in that generation. Average surface deposition densities are relatively constant throughout bronchial airway generations, while average acinar surface deposition densities exhibit a distinct decrease with rising penetration into the acinar region. Due to the correlation between deposition fraction and surface area in a given airway generation, average correlated surface deposition densities are consistently higher than average uncorrelated densities, particularly in the acinar region, where differences can be as high as a few orders of magnitude. Already significant statistical fluctuations of the deposition fractions in individual airway generations are even exacerbated for surface deposition densities, with coefficients of variation about twice as high as for correlated deposition fractions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)809-819
Number of pages11
JournalInhalation Toxicology
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2006

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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The effect of morphological variability on surface deposition densities of inhaled particles in human bronchial and acinar airways. / Hofmann, Werner; Winkler-Heil, Renate; Balásházy, I.

In: Inhalation Toxicology, Vol. 18, No. 10, 01.08.2006, p. 809-819.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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