The effect of food intake on the central monoaminergic system in the snail, Lymnaea stagnalis

L. Hernádi, L. Hiripi, Varya Dyakonova, J. Györi, A. Vehovszky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the effect of food intake on the serotonin and dopamine levels of the CNS as well as on the spontaneous firing activity of the CGC in isolated preparations from starved, feeding and satiated animals. Furthermore we investigated the effects of 1 μM serotonin and/or dopamine and their mixture on the firing activity of the CGC. The HPLC assay of serotonin and dopamine showed that during food intake both the serotonin and dopamine levels of the CNS increased whereas in satiated animals their levels were not significantly more than the control levels. Recording from the CGC in isolated CNS preparation from starved, feeding or satiated animals showed that feeding increased the firing frequency of the CGC compared to the starved control. The application of 1 μM dopamine decreased the firing frequency whereas the application of 1 μM serotonin increased the firing frequency of the CGC. We conclude that during food intake the external and internal food stimuli increase the activity of the central monoaminergic system and also increase the levels of monoamines in the CNS. Furthermore, we also suggest that the increased dopamine and serotonin levels both affect the activity of the serotonergic neurons during the different phases of feeding.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-194
Number of pages10
JournalActa Biologica Hungarica
Volume55
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Lymnaea
Lymnaea stagnalis
food intake
Snails
dopamine
serotonin
snail
snails
Dopamine
Serotonin
Eating
Animals
animal
Serotonergic Neurons
monoamines
animal feeding
Level control
Neurons
firing
effect

Keywords

  • CGC
  • Dopamine
  • Feeding
  • Lymnaea
  • Serotonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

The effect of food intake on the central monoaminergic system in the snail, Lymnaea stagnalis. / Hernádi, L.; Hiripi, L.; Dyakonova, Varya; Györi, J.; Vehovszky, A.

In: Acta Biologica Hungarica, Vol. 55, No. 1-4, 2004, p. 185-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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