The effect of drill-hole length on the primary stability of osteochondral grafts in mosaicplasty

Géza Kordás, Jeno S. Szabó, L. Hangody

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteochondral grafts were transplanted from the trochlea of porcine femurs into drill holes that were 20, 15, and 12 mm in length on the lateral femoral condyle. Grafts initially were pushed in flush with the surrounding cartilage, and then a testing machine pushed the grafts 3 mm deeper. For the 20-, 15-, and 12-mm drill holes, mean forces for pushing the graft flush were 36.58, 43.33, and 118.13 N, respectively, while mean forces for pushing the graft 3 mm deeper were 122.50, 249.33, and 377.25 N, respectively. These results suggest primary stability is better when grafts and drill holes are the same length, but if the recipient hole is shorter, excessive force must be exerted on the cartilage cup during insertion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-404
Number of pages4
JournalOrthopedics
Volume28
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005

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Mandrillus
Transplants
Cartilage
Thigh
Femur
Swine
Bone and Bones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

The effect of drill-hole length on the primary stability of osteochondral grafts in mosaicplasty. / Kordás, Géza; Szabó, Jeno S.; Hangody, L.

In: Orthopedics, Vol. 28, No. 4, 04.2005, p. 401-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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