The effect of dominance hierarchy on the use of alternative foraging tactics: A phenotype-limited producing-scrounging game

Z. Barta, Luc Alain Giraldeau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Group living is thought to be advantageous for animals, though it also creates opportunities for exploitation. Using food discovered by others can be described as a producer-scrounger, frequency-dependent game. In the game, scroungers (parasitic individuals) do better than producers (food finders) when scroungers are rare in the group, but they do worse when scroungers are common. When the individuals' payoffs do not depend on their phenotype (i.e. a symmetric game), this strong negative frequency dependence leads to a mixed stable solution where both alternatives obtain equal payoffs. Here, we address the question of how differences in social status in a dominance hierarchy influence the individuals' decision to play producer or scrounger in small foraging groups. We model explicitly the food intake rate of each individual in a dominance-structured foraging group, then calculate the Nash equilibrium for them. Our model predicts that only strong differences in competitive ability will influence the use of producing or scrounging tactics in small foraging groups; dominants will mainly play scrounger and subordinates will mostly use producer. Since the differences in competitive ability of different-ranking individuals likely depend on the economic defendability of food, our model provides a step towards the integration of social foraging and resource defence theories.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-223
Number of pages7
JournalBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1998

Fingerprint

Social Dominance
phenotype
Aptitude
competitive ability
foraging
Phenotype
Food
food
social status
frequency dependence
food intake
ranking
Eating
Economics
food industry
animal
resource
economics
effect
animals

Keywords

  • Dominance hierarchy
  • Game theory
  • Group foraging
  • Phenotype limitation
  • Producer-scrounger

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

The effect of dominance hierarchy on the use of alternative foraging tactics : A phenotype-limited producing-scrounging game. / Barta, Z.; Giraldeau, Luc Alain.

In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, Vol. 42, No. 3, 03.1998, p. 217-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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