The effect of catecholamines, acetylcholine and histamine on progesterone release by human granulosa cells in a granulosa cell superfusion system

J. Bódis, M. Koppán, L. Kornya, H. R. Tinneberg, A. Török

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are experimental data demonstrating the presence and actions of various neurotransmitters in the ovary, thus supporting the view that they might play a role in intraovarian regulatory mechanisms, although their exact function in the regulation of ovarian hormone secretion is unclear. The objective of the present study was to investigate the direct action of catecholamines, acetylcholine and histamine on progesterone secretion of human granulosa cells in a superfused cell system. Human granulosa cells were isolated from preovulatory follicular fluid using a Percoll gradient centrifugation method. Approximately 2 × 106 cells were mixed with Sephadex G-10 and were transferred into two chambers of the superfusion apparatus. The system was perfused with a culture medium and test materials were added to the system at a dose of 100 pmol/ml. The progesterone concentration of samples was measured using an 125I radioimmunoassay. Administration of epinephrine (adrenaline), norepinephrine (noradrenaline), dopamine and histamine had no effect on progesterone release. However, acetylcholine produced a significant progesterone release, which could be blocked by atropine. The observed effect of acetylcholine on progesterone release of superfused human granulosa cells may reflect a physiological role of acetylcholine in the regulation of granulosa cell function during the menstrual cycle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-264
Number of pages6
JournalGynecological Endocrinology
Volume16
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2002

Fingerprint

Granulosa Cells
Histamine
Acetylcholine
Catecholamines
Progesterone
Epinephrine
Norepinephrine
Follicular Fluid
Menstrual Cycle
Centrifugation
Atropine
Radioimmunoassay
Neurotransmitter Agents
Culture Media
Ovary
Dopamine
Hormones

Keywords

  • Acetylcholine
  • Catecholamines
  • Granulosa cell superfusion
  • Histamine
  • Progesterone release
  • Propranolol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

The effect of catecholamines, acetylcholine and histamine on progesterone release by human granulosa cells in a granulosa cell superfusion system. / Bódis, J.; Koppán, M.; Kornya, L.; Tinneberg, H. R.; Török, A.

In: Gynecological Endocrinology, Vol. 16, No. 4, 08.2002, p. 259-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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