The deepest symmetries of nature: CPT and SUSY

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The structure of matter is related to symmetries on every level of study. CPT symmetry is one of the most important laws of field theory: it states the invariance of physical properties when one simultaneously changes the signs of the charge and of the spatial and time coordinates of particles. Although in general opinion CPT symmetry is not violated in Nature, there are theoretical attempts to develop CPT-violating models. The Antiproton Decelerator at CERN has been built to test CPT invariance. Several observations imply that there might be another deep symmetry, supersymmetry (SUSY), between basic fermions and bosons. SUSY assumes that every fermion and boson observed so far has supersymmetric partners of the opposite nature. In addition to some theoretical problems of the Standard Model of elementary particles, supersymmetry may provide solution to the constituents of the mysterious dark matter of the Universe. However, as opposed to CPT, SUSY is necessarily violated at low energies as so far none of the predicted supersymmetric partners of existing particles was observed experimentally. The LHC experiments at CERN aim to search for these particles.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAIP Conference Proceedings
Pages54-70
Number of pages17
Volume793
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 19 2005
EventPHYSICS WITH ULTRA SLOW ANTIPROTON BEAMS - Wako, Japan
Duration: Mar 14 2005Mar 16 2005

Other

OtherPHYSICS WITH ULTRA SLOW ANTIPROTON BEAMS
CountryJapan
CityWako
Period3/14/053/16/05

Fingerprint

supersymmetry
symmetry
invariance
bosons
fermions
brakes (for arresting motion)
elementary particles
antiprotons
dark matter
universe
physical properties
energy

Keywords

  • CPT invariance
  • Higgs mechanism
  • Supersymmetry
  • Symmetry breaking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Horváth, D. (2005). The deepest symmetries of nature: CPT and SUSY. In AIP Conference Proceedings (Vol. 793, pp. 54-70) https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2121970

The deepest symmetries of nature : CPT and SUSY. / Horváth, D.

AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 793 2005. p. 54-70.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Horváth, D 2005, The deepest symmetries of nature: CPT and SUSY. in AIP Conference Proceedings. vol. 793, pp. 54-70, PHYSICS WITH ULTRA SLOW ANTIPROTON BEAMS, Wako, Japan, 3/14/05. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2121970
Horváth D. The deepest symmetries of nature: CPT and SUSY. In AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 793. 2005. p. 54-70 https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2121970
Horváth, D. / The deepest symmetries of nature : CPT and SUSY. AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 793 2005. pp. 54-70
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