The Debrecen Stroke Database: demographic characteristics, risk factors, stroke severity and outcome in 8088 consecutive hospitalised patients with acute cerebrovascular disease

D. Bereczki, L. Mihálka, I. Fekete, A. Valikovics, T. Csépány, B. Fülesdi, Z. Bajkó, C. Szekeres, K. Fekete, L. Csiba

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17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High stroke mortality in central-eastern European countries might be due to higher stroke incidence, more severe strokes or less effective acute care than in countries with lower mortality rate. Hospital databases usually yield more detailed information on risk factors, stroke severity and short-term outcome than population-based registries. The Debrecen Stroke Database, data of 8088 consecutively hospitalised patients with acute cerebrovascular disease in a single stroke centre in East Hungary between October 1994 and December 2006, is analysed. Risk factors were recorded and stroke severity on admission was scored by the Mathew stroke scale. The modified Glasgow outcome scale was used to describe patient condition at discharge. Mean age was 68±13 years, 11·4% had haemorrhagic stroke. The rate of hypertension on admission was 79% in men, and 84% in women, 40·3% of men and 19·8% of women were smokers, and 34% of all patients had a previous cerebrovascular disease in their history. Case fatality was 14·9%, and 43% had some disability at discharge. Outcome at discharge was worse with higher age, higher glucose, higher blood pressure, higher white cell count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and more severe clinical signs on admission. In multivariate analysis admission blood pressure lost its significance in predicting outcome. In this large Hungarian stroke unit database hypertension on admission, smoking and previous cerebrovascular disease were more frequent than in most western databases. These findings indicate major opportunities for more efficient stroke prevention in this and probably other eastern European countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-339
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Stroke
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

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Cerebrovascular Disorders
Acute Disease
Stroke
Demography
Databases
Hypertension
Glasgow Outcome Scale
Mortality
Hungary
Blood Sedimentation
Registries
Multivariate Analysis
Cell Count
Smoking
History

Keywords

  • Acute
  • Blood pressure
  • Cerebral haemorrhage
  • Epidemiology
  • Ischaemic stroke
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology

Cite this

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title = "The Debrecen Stroke Database: demographic characteristics, risk factors, stroke severity and outcome in 8088 consecutive hospitalised patients with acute cerebrovascular disease",
abstract = "High stroke mortality in central-eastern European countries might be due to higher stroke incidence, more severe strokes or less effective acute care than in countries with lower mortality rate. Hospital databases usually yield more detailed information on risk factors, stroke severity and short-term outcome than population-based registries. The Debrecen Stroke Database, data of 8088 consecutively hospitalised patients with acute cerebrovascular disease in a single stroke centre in East Hungary between October 1994 and December 2006, is analysed. Risk factors were recorded and stroke severity on admission was scored by the Mathew stroke scale. The modified Glasgow outcome scale was used to describe patient condition at discharge. Mean age was 68±13 years, 11·4{\%} had haemorrhagic stroke. The rate of hypertension on admission was 79{\%} in men, and 84{\%} in women, 40·3{\%} of men and 19·8{\%} of women were smokers, and 34{\%} of all patients had a previous cerebrovascular disease in their history. Case fatality was 14·9{\%}, and 43{\%} had some disability at discharge. Outcome at discharge was worse with higher age, higher glucose, higher blood pressure, higher white cell count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and more severe clinical signs on admission. In multivariate analysis admission blood pressure lost its significance in predicting outcome. In this large Hungarian stroke unit database hypertension on admission, smoking and previous cerebrovascular disease were more frequent than in most western databases. These findings indicate major opportunities for more efficient stroke prevention in this and probably other eastern European countries.",
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AU - Bereczki, D.

AU - Mihálka, L.

AU - Fekete, I.

AU - Valikovics, A.

AU - Csépány, T.

AU - Fülesdi, B.

AU - Bajkó, Z.

AU - Szekeres, C.

AU - Fekete, K.

AU - Csiba, L.

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N2 - High stroke mortality in central-eastern European countries might be due to higher stroke incidence, more severe strokes or less effective acute care than in countries with lower mortality rate. Hospital databases usually yield more detailed information on risk factors, stroke severity and short-term outcome than population-based registries. The Debrecen Stroke Database, data of 8088 consecutively hospitalised patients with acute cerebrovascular disease in a single stroke centre in East Hungary between October 1994 and December 2006, is analysed. Risk factors were recorded and stroke severity on admission was scored by the Mathew stroke scale. The modified Glasgow outcome scale was used to describe patient condition at discharge. Mean age was 68±13 years, 11·4% had haemorrhagic stroke. The rate of hypertension on admission was 79% in men, and 84% in women, 40·3% of men and 19·8% of women were smokers, and 34% of all patients had a previous cerebrovascular disease in their history. Case fatality was 14·9%, and 43% had some disability at discharge. Outcome at discharge was worse with higher age, higher glucose, higher blood pressure, higher white cell count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and more severe clinical signs on admission. In multivariate analysis admission blood pressure lost its significance in predicting outcome. In this large Hungarian stroke unit database hypertension on admission, smoking and previous cerebrovascular disease were more frequent than in most western databases. These findings indicate major opportunities for more efficient stroke prevention in this and probably other eastern European countries.

AB - High stroke mortality in central-eastern European countries might be due to higher stroke incidence, more severe strokes or less effective acute care than in countries with lower mortality rate. Hospital databases usually yield more detailed information on risk factors, stroke severity and short-term outcome than population-based registries. The Debrecen Stroke Database, data of 8088 consecutively hospitalised patients with acute cerebrovascular disease in a single stroke centre in East Hungary between October 1994 and December 2006, is analysed. Risk factors were recorded and stroke severity on admission was scored by the Mathew stroke scale. The modified Glasgow outcome scale was used to describe patient condition at discharge. Mean age was 68±13 years, 11·4% had haemorrhagic stroke. The rate of hypertension on admission was 79% in men, and 84% in women, 40·3% of men and 19·8% of women were smokers, and 34% of all patients had a previous cerebrovascular disease in their history. Case fatality was 14·9%, and 43% had some disability at discharge. Outcome at discharge was worse with higher age, higher glucose, higher blood pressure, higher white cell count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and more severe clinical signs on admission. In multivariate analysis admission blood pressure lost its significance in predicting outcome. In this large Hungarian stroke unit database hypertension on admission, smoking and previous cerebrovascular disease were more frequent than in most western databases. These findings indicate major opportunities for more efficient stroke prevention in this and probably other eastern European countries.

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