The current perspective on tick-borne encephalitis awareness and prevention in six Central and Eastern European countries: Report from a meeting of experts convened to discuss TBE in their region

Herwig Kollaritsch, Václav Chmelík, Irina Dontsenko, Anna Grzeszczuk, Maciej Kondrusik, Vytautas Usonis, A. Lakos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a potentially life-threatening disease in humans and is caused by a flavivirus spread by infected ticks (Ixodes ricinus and Ixodes persulcatus). TBE is endemic across much of Central and Eastern Europe and the incidence is increasing, with numbers estimated to be as many as 8755 cases per year. The reasons for this increase are multi-faceted and may involve improvements in diagnosis and reporting of TBE cases, increases in recreational activities in areas inhabited by infected ticks and changes in climatic conditions affecting tick habitats. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing TBE; following a successful nationwide vaccination campaign in Austria, the annual number of TBE cases fell to about 10% of those reported in the pre-vaccination era.This report describes the findings of a group of leading experts from six Central and Eastern European countries who convened to discuss TBE in their region during the 28th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases (ESPID) Nice, France, 4-8 May 2010.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4556-4564
Number of pages9
JournalVaccine
Volume29
Issue number28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 20 2011

Fingerprint

tick-borne encephalitis
Tick-Borne Encephalitis
Eastern European region
Central European region
Ticks
ticks
Ixodes
vaccination
Vaccination
Ixodes persulcatus
Flavivirus
Eastern Europe
Immunization Programs
Ixodes ricinus
Austria
recreation
human diseases
France
Ecosystem
climate change

Keywords

  • Flavivirus
  • TBE
  • Tick-borne encephalitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • veterinary(all)
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

The current perspective on tick-borne encephalitis awareness and prevention in six Central and Eastern European countries : Report from a meeting of experts convened to discuss TBE in their region. / Kollaritsch, Herwig; Chmelík, Václav; Dontsenko, Irina; Grzeszczuk, Anna; Kondrusik, Maciej; Usonis, Vytautas; Lakos, A.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 29, No. 28, 20.06.2011, p. 4556-4564.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kollaritsch, Herwig ; Chmelík, Václav ; Dontsenko, Irina ; Grzeszczuk, Anna ; Kondrusik, Maciej ; Usonis, Vytautas ; Lakos, A. / The current perspective on tick-borne encephalitis awareness and prevention in six Central and Eastern European countries : Report from a meeting of experts convened to discuss TBE in their region. In: Vaccine. 2011 ; Vol. 29, No. 28. pp. 4556-4564.
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