The complete degradation of acetanilide by a consortium of microbes isolated from River Maros

Lóránt Hatvani, L. Manczinger, Tamás Marik, Szilvia Bajkán, Lívia Vidács, Ottó Bencsik, A. Szekeres, Isidora Radulov, Lucian Nita, C. Vágvölgyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemical pollutants occurring in rivers may have severe effects on human health along with being harmful to the environment. Bioaugmentation is a potential tool for the removal of xenobiotics from soil and water therefore the objectives of this study were the isolation, identification and characterization of microbes with acetanilide- and aniline-degrading properties from the River Maros. Microbes isolated on minimal media containing acetanilide or aniline-HCl as a sole carbon and nitrogen source were considered as acetanilide- or anilinedegraders. The decomposition of acetanilide and aniline were followed by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). An acetanilide-degrading bacterium, identified as Rhodococcus erythropolis, was able to convert acetanilide to aniline, which was further decomposed by the fungal isolate Aspergillus ustus when the two microbes were co-cultivated in a minimal medium containing acetanilide as a sole carbon and nitrogen source. The strains isolated in this study might be used in approaches addressing the biodegradation of acetanilide and aniline in the environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-120
Number of pages4
JournalActa Biologica Szegediensis
Volume57
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

aniline
Rivers
microorganisms
Degradation
rivers
degradation
Rhodococcus erythropolis
carbon
nitrogen
xenobiotics
Nitrogen
biodegradation
Carbon
Aspergillus
High pressure liquid chromatography
human health
Rhodococcus
high performance liquid chromatography
pollutants
acetanilide

Keywords

  • Aspergillusustus
  • Bioaugmentation
  • Rhodococcus erythropolis
  • Xenobiotics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

The complete degradation of acetanilide by a consortium of microbes isolated from River Maros. / Hatvani, Lóránt; Manczinger, L.; Marik, Tamás; Bajkán, Szilvia; Vidács, Lívia; Bencsik, Ottó; Szekeres, A.; Radulov, Isidora; Nita, Lucian; Vágvölgyi, C.

In: Acta Biologica Szegediensis, Vol. 57, No. 2, 2013, p. 117-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hatvani, L, Manczinger, L, Marik, T, Bajkán, S, Vidács, L, Bencsik, O, Szekeres, A, Radulov, I, Nita, L & Vágvölgyi, C 2013, 'The complete degradation of acetanilide by a consortium of microbes isolated from River Maros', Acta Biologica Szegediensis, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 117-120.
Hatvani, Lóránt ; Manczinger, L. ; Marik, Tamás ; Bajkán, Szilvia ; Vidács, Lívia ; Bencsik, Ottó ; Szekeres, A. ; Radulov, Isidora ; Nita, Lucian ; Vágvölgyi, C. / The complete degradation of acetanilide by a consortium of microbes isolated from River Maros. In: Acta Biologica Szegediensis. 2013 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 117-120.
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