The comparative effects of abrupt vs. stepwise discontinuation of TPN in rats

G. Bodoky, Antonio C. Campos, Zhong Jin Yang, David C. Hitch, Michael M. Meguid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The comparative effects of discontinuing total parenteral nutrition (TPN: caloric ratio of glucose:fat:amino acid = 50:30:20) abruptly or in a stepwise manner on spontaneous food intake were investigated in two studies. Study 1: In 16 rats, TPN was given for 4 days, then stopped abruptly in eight rats. In the other eight rats, TPN was tapered; they received TPN at 75%, 50%, and 25% of their mean daily energy requirements per day for 3 consecutive days, and then switched to normal saline. Total parenteral nutrition induced a significant 60% reduction in spontaneous food intake (SFI) in both groups during the first TPN day. After 4 days of TPN, an 80% decrease in SFI had occurred in both groups. Resumption of SFI was significantly sooner in the abruptly-stopping group than in the stepwise-stopping group. But, in the latter group, there was a significantly greater cumulative caloric intake during the entire study. Study 2: In 32 rats, TPN providing either 100%, 50%, or 25% of their mean daily caloric requirements was given to three groups each of eight rats, for 3 days, then abruptly changed to normal saline; control rats received normal saline throughout. The TPN-induced decrease in SFI was proportional to the caloric density of the solution infused. Three days of 100%, 50%, or 25% TPN infusion led to an approximate 85%, 60%, or 35% decrease in SFI, respectively. Spontaneous food intake recovery was independent of the caloric density of TPN. Taken together, data show that tapering TPN: i) does not result in a compensatory increase in SFI, ii) leads to a delay in attaining adequate oral energy intake independent of TPN, and iii) leads to a greater cumulative energy intake during the time to full SFI recovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)591-595
Number of pages5
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1992

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Eating
Energy Intake
Total Parenteral Nutrition
Fats
Amino Acids
Glucose

Keywords

  • Cessation of TPN
  • Food intake
  • Parenteral nutrition
  • Resumption of food intake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology (medical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

The comparative effects of abrupt vs. stepwise discontinuation of TPN in rats. / Bodoky, G.; Campos, Antonio C.; Yang, Zhong Jin; Hitch, David C.; Meguid, Michael M.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 52, No. 3, 1992, p. 591-595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bodoky, G. ; Campos, Antonio C. ; Yang, Zhong Jin ; Hitch, David C. ; Meguid, Michael M. / The comparative effects of abrupt vs. stepwise discontinuation of TPN in rats. In: Physiology and Behavior. 1992 ; Vol. 52, No. 3. pp. 591-595.
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