The communicative relevance of auditory nuisance: Barks that are connected to negative inner states in dogs can predict annoyance level in humans

P. Pongrácz, Nikolett Czinege, Thaissa Menezes Pavan Haynes, Rosana Suemi Tokumaru, A. Miklósi, Tamas Farago

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Excessive dog barking is among the leading sources of noise pollution worldwide; however, the reasons for the annoyance of barking to people remained uninvestigated. Our questions were: is the annoyance rating affected by the acoustic parameters of barks; does the attributed inner state of the dog and the nuisance caused by its barks correlate; does the gender and country of origin affect the subjects' sensitivity to barking. Participants from Hungary (N = 100) and Brazil (N = 60) were tested with sets of 27 artificial bark sequences. Subjects rated each bark according to the inner state of the dog and the annoyance caused by the particular bark. Subjects from both countries found high-pitched barks the most annoying: however, harsh, fast-pulsing, low-pitched barks were also unpleasant. Men found high-pitched barks more annoying than the women did. Annoyance ratings showed positive correlation with assumed negative inner states of the dog, positive emotional ratings showed negative correlation with the annoyance level. This is the first indication that acoustic features that were selected for effective vocal signalling may be annoying for human listeners. Among the explanations for this effect the role of affective communication and similar bioacoustics of particular animal vocalizations and baby cries are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-47
Number of pages22
JournalInteraction Studies
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Bioacoustics
bark
Acoustics
rating
Noise pollution
acoustics
dogs
noise pollution
Animals
country of origin
listener
Hungary
baby
indication
Communication
Brazil
animal
communication
gender
bioacoustics

Keywords

  • Annoyance
  • Bioacoustics
  • Communication
  • Dog
  • Nuisance Bark

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

The communicative relevance of auditory nuisance : Barks that are connected to negative inner states in dogs can predict annoyance level in humans. / Pongrácz, P.; Czinege, Nikolett; Haynes, Thaissa Menezes Pavan; Tokumaru, Rosana Suemi; Miklósi, A.; Farago, Tamas.

In: Interaction Studies, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2016, p. 26-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pongrácz, P. ; Czinege, Nikolett ; Haynes, Thaissa Menezes Pavan ; Tokumaru, Rosana Suemi ; Miklósi, A. ; Farago, Tamas. / The communicative relevance of auditory nuisance : Barks that are connected to negative inner states in dogs can predict annoyance level in humans. In: Interaction Studies. 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 26-47.
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