The central vasopressinergic system in experimental left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction

Frank Muders, Günter A J Riegger, Udo Bahner, M. Palkóvits

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the course of cardiac diseases, various neurohormonal systems in the plasma are activated. So far there have been only isolated results of investigations about the functional state of central neuropeptide systems in cardiac diseases and, in particular, in heart failure. We investigated, therefore, the central vasopressinergic system, an important neuropeptide system in cardiocirculatory regulation in a model of myocardial hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction, a model of supravalvular aortic stenosis. In addition to increased vasopressin concentrations in plasma, central vasopressin is also altered in this model. A differential stimulation of vasopressin in the hypothalamic areas and in the areas of the brain stem that are involved in central cardiocirculatory regulation was detected. Reduced vasopressin concentrations in the locus coeruleus, an important regulatory area of sympathetic nervous activity, suggest a central regulatory mechanism through which stimulation of the sympathetic nervous activity can be prevented. Our investigations showed that non-osmotic factors like the baroreceptor reflex and angiotensin II, are important stimuli of the vasopressinergic system. We were also able to show that the central vasopressinergic system in rats with experimental heart failure and myocardial hypertrophy is inhibited by treatment with an ACE inhibitor and AT1 receptor antagonist. As seen with autoradiography, this effect is mediated by a central effect of the drugs. Research into central regulatory mechanisms in cardiovascular diseases is, on the one hand, of crucial importance to our understanding of complex pathophysiological processes, and on the other hand, it serves the development of new therapeutic approaches with the goal of influencing these mechanisms directly pharmacologically and for the elucidation of central, currently unknown effects of cardiovascular drugs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)275-279
Number of pages5
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume139
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Vasopressins
Neuropeptides
Hypertrophy
Heart Diseases
Heart Failure
Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis
Cardiovascular Agents
Locus Coeruleus
Baroreflex
Autoradiography
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Angiotensin II
Brain Stem
Cardiovascular Diseases
Therapeutics
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The central vasopressinergic system in experimental left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction. / Muders, Frank; Riegger, Günter A J; Bahner, Udo; Palkóvits, M.

In: Progress in Brain Research, Vol. 139, 2002, p. 275-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3854e52c3e4d4e16a22360802232bc83,
title = "The central vasopressinergic system in experimental left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction",
abstract = "In the course of cardiac diseases, various neurohormonal systems in the plasma are activated. So far there have been only isolated results of investigations about the functional state of central neuropeptide systems in cardiac diseases and, in particular, in heart failure. We investigated, therefore, the central vasopressinergic system, an important neuropeptide system in cardiocirculatory regulation in a model of myocardial hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction, a model of supravalvular aortic stenosis. In addition to increased vasopressin concentrations in plasma, central vasopressin is also altered in this model. A differential stimulation of vasopressin in the hypothalamic areas and in the areas of the brain stem that are involved in central cardiocirculatory regulation was detected. Reduced vasopressin concentrations in the locus coeruleus, an important regulatory area of sympathetic nervous activity, suggest a central regulatory mechanism through which stimulation of the sympathetic nervous activity can be prevented. Our investigations showed that non-osmotic factors like the baroreceptor reflex and angiotensin II, are important stimuli of the vasopressinergic system. We were also able to show that the central vasopressinergic system in rats with experimental heart failure and myocardial hypertrophy is inhibited by treatment with an ACE inhibitor and AT1 receptor antagonist. As seen with autoradiography, this effect is mediated by a central effect of the drugs. Research into central regulatory mechanisms in cardiovascular diseases is, on the one hand, of crucial importance to our understanding of complex pathophysiological processes, and on the other hand, it serves the development of new therapeutic approaches with the goal of influencing these mechanisms directly pharmacologically and for the elucidation of central, currently unknown effects of cardiovascular drugs.",
author = "Frank Muders and Riegger, {G{\"u}nter A J} and Udo Bahner and M. Palk{\'o}vits",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1016/S0079-6123(02)39023-X",
language = "English",
volume = "139",
pages = "275--279",
journal = "Progress in Brain Research",
issn = "0079-6123",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The central vasopressinergic system in experimental left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction

AU - Muders, Frank

AU - Riegger, Günter A J

AU - Bahner, Udo

AU - Palkóvits, M.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - In the course of cardiac diseases, various neurohormonal systems in the plasma are activated. So far there have been only isolated results of investigations about the functional state of central neuropeptide systems in cardiac diseases and, in particular, in heart failure. We investigated, therefore, the central vasopressinergic system, an important neuropeptide system in cardiocirculatory regulation in a model of myocardial hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction, a model of supravalvular aortic stenosis. In addition to increased vasopressin concentrations in plasma, central vasopressin is also altered in this model. A differential stimulation of vasopressin in the hypothalamic areas and in the areas of the brain stem that are involved in central cardiocirculatory regulation was detected. Reduced vasopressin concentrations in the locus coeruleus, an important regulatory area of sympathetic nervous activity, suggest a central regulatory mechanism through which stimulation of the sympathetic nervous activity can be prevented. Our investigations showed that non-osmotic factors like the baroreceptor reflex and angiotensin II, are important stimuli of the vasopressinergic system. We were also able to show that the central vasopressinergic system in rats with experimental heart failure and myocardial hypertrophy is inhibited by treatment with an ACE inhibitor and AT1 receptor antagonist. As seen with autoradiography, this effect is mediated by a central effect of the drugs. Research into central regulatory mechanisms in cardiovascular diseases is, on the one hand, of crucial importance to our understanding of complex pathophysiological processes, and on the other hand, it serves the development of new therapeutic approaches with the goal of influencing these mechanisms directly pharmacologically and for the elucidation of central, currently unknown effects of cardiovascular drugs.

AB - In the course of cardiac diseases, various neurohormonal systems in the plasma are activated. So far there have been only isolated results of investigations about the functional state of central neuropeptide systems in cardiac diseases and, in particular, in heart failure. We investigated, therefore, the central vasopressinergic system, an important neuropeptide system in cardiocirculatory regulation in a model of myocardial hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction, a model of supravalvular aortic stenosis. In addition to increased vasopressin concentrations in plasma, central vasopressin is also altered in this model. A differential stimulation of vasopressin in the hypothalamic areas and in the areas of the brain stem that are involved in central cardiocirculatory regulation was detected. Reduced vasopressin concentrations in the locus coeruleus, an important regulatory area of sympathetic nervous activity, suggest a central regulatory mechanism through which stimulation of the sympathetic nervous activity can be prevented. Our investigations showed that non-osmotic factors like the baroreceptor reflex and angiotensin II, are important stimuli of the vasopressinergic system. We were also able to show that the central vasopressinergic system in rats with experimental heart failure and myocardial hypertrophy is inhibited by treatment with an ACE inhibitor and AT1 receptor antagonist. As seen with autoradiography, this effect is mediated by a central effect of the drugs. Research into central regulatory mechanisms in cardiovascular diseases is, on the one hand, of crucial importance to our understanding of complex pathophysiological processes, and on the other hand, it serves the development of new therapeutic approaches with the goal of influencing these mechanisms directly pharmacologically and for the elucidation of central, currently unknown effects of cardiovascular drugs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036454222&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036454222&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0079-6123(02)39023-X

DO - 10.1016/S0079-6123(02)39023-X

M3 - Article

C2 - 12436942

AN - SCOPUS:0036454222

VL - 139

SP - 275

EP - 279

JO - Progress in Brain Research

JF - Progress in Brain Research

SN - 0079-6123

ER -