The biological mechanisms of aging

A historical and critical overview

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This overview describes the historical background and modern versions of selected theories of the mechanisms of biological aging, including the mutation or genome instability theory, the free radical or oxidative stress theory, the mitochondrial theory, the error catastrophe theory, the altered protein or protein homeostasis dysregulation theory, the dysdifferentiation or epigenetic theory and the hyperfunction theory. The author has been involved in the development of some of these theories, which are therefore described in more detail. A discussion on the definition of aging and general comments on aging theory are included. The most popular theory of aging, the free radical or oxidative theory, was proposed more than 50 years ago but has recently faced severe criticism. To date, no single theory has been able to successfully explain the mechanisms of aging. We are thus awaiting the appearance of a new paradigm or an integration of the existing theories for a better understanding of the mechanisms of aging.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAging Mechanisms: Longevity, Metabolism, and Brain Aging
PublisherSpringer Japan
Pages3-27
Number of pages25
ISBN (Print)9784431557630, 9784431557623
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Free Radicals
Aging of materials
Genomic Instability
Epigenomics
Proteins
Oxidative Stress
Homeostasis
Mutation
Oxidative stress
Genes

Keywords

  • Altered protein theory of aging
  • Dysdifferentiation theory of aging
  • Error catastrophe theory of aging
  • Free radical theory of aging
  • Hyperfunction theory of aging
  • Mechanisms of aging
  • Mitochondria theory of aging
  • Mutation theory of aging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Goto, S. (2015). The biological mechanisms of aging: A historical and critical overview. In Aging Mechanisms: Longevity, Metabolism, and Brain Aging (pp. 3-27). Springer Japan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-55763-0_1

The biological mechanisms of aging : A historical and critical overview. / Goto, S.

Aging Mechanisms: Longevity, Metabolism, and Brain Aging. Springer Japan, 2015. p. 3-27.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Goto, S 2015, The biological mechanisms of aging: A historical and critical overview. in Aging Mechanisms: Longevity, Metabolism, and Brain Aging. Springer Japan, pp. 3-27. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-55763-0_1
Goto S. The biological mechanisms of aging: A historical and critical overview. In Aging Mechanisms: Longevity, Metabolism, and Brain Aging. Springer Japan. 2015. p. 3-27 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-55763-0_1
Goto, S. / The biological mechanisms of aging : A historical and critical overview. Aging Mechanisms: Longevity, Metabolism, and Brain Aging. Springer Japan, 2015. pp. 3-27
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