The biological effects of deuterium-depleted water, a possible new tool in cancer therapy

G. Somlyai, G. Laskay, T. Berkenyi, Z. Galbacs, G. Galbács, S. A. Kiss, Gy Jakli, G. Jancsó

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is known that the mass difference between hydrogen and deuterium leads to differences in the physical and chemical behaviour between the two stable isotopes. In spite of the fact that the concentration of D is about 150 ppm (over 16 mM) in surface water and more than 10 mM in living organisms the possible role of the naturally occurring deuterium in biological systems was never investigated before 1993. The first experiments with deuterium- depleted water (DDW) revealed that due to the D-depletion the non-tumorous L929 fibroblast cells required longer time to multiply in vitro and DDW caused human breast tumor regression in mice. In this communication we present additional evidence demonstrating that DDW i) inhibits cell proliferation of A4 cell line in vitro; ii) as drinking water inhibits the PC-3 human prostate tumor growth in mice, induces apoptosis in vivo, iii) can induce complete or partial tumor regression in dogs and cats with different tumors. Based upon the observations gained with DDW we suppose that the cells are able to regulate the D/H ratio and the changes in the D/H ratio can trigger certain molecular mechanisms. We suggest that the application of DDW may open new possibilities in cancer therapy by offering a direct intervention into the mechanism playing a central role in cell cycle regulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-94
Number of pages4
JournalZeitschrift fur Onkologie
Volume30
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Deuterium
Water
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Isotopes
Drinking Water
Prostate
Hydrogen
Cell Cycle
Cats
Fibroblasts
Cell Proliferation
Dogs
Apoptosis
Breast Neoplasms
Cell Line
Growth

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Cancer therapy
  • Cell signaling
  • DDW
  • Deuterium-depleted water
  • Tumor regression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

The biological effects of deuterium-depleted water, a possible new tool in cancer therapy. / Somlyai, G.; Laskay, G.; Berkenyi, T.; Galbacs, Z.; Galbács, G.; Kiss, S. A.; Jakli, Gy; Jancsó, G.

In: Zeitschrift fur Onkologie, Vol. 30, No. 4, 1998, p. 91-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Somlyai, G, Laskay, G, Berkenyi, T, Galbacs, Z, Galbács, G, Kiss, SA, Jakli, G & Jancsó, G 1998, 'The biological effects of deuterium-depleted water, a possible new tool in cancer therapy', Zeitschrift fur Onkologie, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 91-94.
Somlyai, G. ; Laskay, G. ; Berkenyi, T. ; Galbacs, Z. ; Galbács, G. ; Kiss, S. A. ; Jakli, Gy ; Jancsó, G. / The biological effects of deuterium-depleted water, a possible new tool in cancer therapy. In: Zeitschrift fur Onkologie. 1998 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 91-94.
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