The application of in vivo microiontophoresis for the investigation of mast cell-neuron interactions in the rat brain

Zsombor Koszegi, Péter Kovács, M. Wilhelm, Tamás Atlasz, Norbert Babai, Veronika Kállai, I. Hernádi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although mast cells are immune cells of hematopoietic origin, they can be found in parts of the central nervous system of many mammalian species. In the rat brain they are located in the thalamic region. Their function is not defined yet, although they are mostly known to secrete several chemicals, which may influence the surrounding neurons. There are no in vivo electrophysiological data available on the possible effects of brain mast cells on neurons. In this study, we used a combined method of microiontophoresis and extracellular single unit recording to simultaneously activate mast cells and record neuronal action potentials. Four-barrelled micropipettes were used for recording neuronal activity and for microiontophoretic application of mast cell degranulator Compound 48/80 (C48/80). Spike sorting routines were performed on-line and off-line to ensure that data were always recorded from a single neuron. C48/80 did not modify the firing rate of cortical neurons (no mast cells are found there), however, it caused excitation (n = 16/37, 43%), or inhibition (n = 9/37, 24%) in thalamic neurons possibly due to mast cell activation. Further investigations will clarify the biochemical nature of changes in neural excitability due to mast cell degranulation in the mammalian brain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-231
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Biochemical and Biophysical Methods
Volume69
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 30 2006

Fingerprint

Mast Cells
Cell Communication
Neurons
Rats
Brain
p-Methoxy-N-methylphenethylamine
Neurology
Sorting
Cell Degranulation
Chemical activation
Action Potentials
Central Nervous System

Keywords

  • Electrophysiology
  • Mast cells
  • Microiontophoresis
  • Thalamus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics

Cite this

The application of in vivo microiontophoresis for the investigation of mast cell-neuron interactions in the rat brain. / Koszegi, Zsombor; Kovács, Péter; Wilhelm, M.; Atlasz, Tamás; Babai, Norbert; Kállai, Veronika; Hernádi, I.

In: Journal of Biochemical and Biophysical Methods, Vol. 69, No. 1-2, 30.11.2006, p. 227-231.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koszegi, Zsombor ; Kovács, Péter ; Wilhelm, M. ; Atlasz, Tamás ; Babai, Norbert ; Kállai, Veronika ; Hernádi, I. / The application of in vivo microiontophoresis for the investigation of mast cell-neuron interactions in the rat brain. In: Journal of Biochemical and Biophysical Methods. 2006 ; Vol. 69, No. 1-2. pp. 227-231.
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