Temporal variation of electrical signal recorded in a standing tree

A. Koppán, L. Szarka, V. Wesztergom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a geophysically motivated experiment, two pairs of electrodes were deepened in the sapwood of a beech tree (Fagus sylvatica), standing in the botanic garden of the Sopron University and the potential differences were recorded for more than one year with a sampling interval of 1 minute. The environmental parameters (such as meteorology, atmospheric electricity, geomagnetic field variation) were simultaneously measured partly at the same location, and partly in the Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory. The records show a complicated response of the tree to the environmental electric effects. The potential difference curves belonging to the two closely-spaced pairs of electrodes are quasi-parallel, but sometimes they seem to be contradictory. In case of a low level of the atmospheric electricity and when there was no precipitation, in springtime, we observed characteristic sinusoidal signals with a period of exactly one day and with a peak-to-peak amplitude of about ten millivolts. According to Morat et al. (1994) they might be connected to the daily variation of the sap flow. In our experiment, the phenomenon appeared with a smaller amplitude (about 10 mV from peak-to-peak) than in the experiment by Morat et al. (1994). The inflexion points of the daily variations were observed at about midnight and at noon; the maximum appears in the morning hours.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-180
Number of pages12
JournalActa Geodaetica et Geophysica Hungarica
Volume34
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Atmospheric electricity
atmospheric electricity
temporal variation
diurnal variation
electrode
sap flow
Electrodes
Meteorology
geophysical observatories
experiment
Experiments
Precipitation (meteorology)
Observatories
geomagnetic field
meteorology
inflection points
garden
noon
electrodes
morning

Keywords

  • Atmospheric electricity
  • Electrical potential difference
  • Fagus sylvatica
  • Sap flow
  • Standing tree

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Temporal variation of electrical signal recorded in a standing tree. / Koppán, A.; Szarka, L.; Wesztergom, V.

In: Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica Hungarica, Vol. 34, No. 1-2, 1999, p. 169-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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