Temperature dependence of Henry's law constant in an extended temperature range

M. Görgényi, Jo Dewulf, Herman Van Langenhove

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The Henry's law constants H for chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, trichloroethene, chlorobenzene, benzene and toluene were determined by the EPICS-SPME technique (equilibrium partitioning in closed systems - solid phase microextraction) in the temperature range 275-343 K. The curvature observed in the 1n H vs. 1/T plot was due to the temperature dependence of the change in enthalpy ΔH0 during the transfer of 1 mol solute from the aqueous solution to the gas phase. The nonlinearity of the plot was explained by means of a thermodynamic model which involves the temperature dependence of ΔH0 of the compounds and the thermal expansion of water in the three-parameter equation In (HΡTT) = A2/T + BTB + C2, where ΡT is the density of water at temperature T, TB = 1n(T/298) + (298 - T)/T, A2 = -ΔH2980/R, ΔH2980 is the ΔH0 value at 298 K, B = ΔCP0/R, and C2 is a constant. ACp0 is the molar heat capacity change in volatilization from the aqueous solution. A statistical comparison of the two models demonstrates the superiority of the three-parameter equation over the two-parameter one 1n H vs. 1/T). The new, three-parameter equation allows a more accurate description of the temperature dependence of H, and of the solubility of volatile organic compounds in water at higher temperatures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)757-762
Number of pages6
JournalChemosphere
Volume48
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Temperature
temperature
varespladib methyl
aqueous solution
Water
Hot Temperature
chlorobenzene
heat capacity
thermal expansion
Trichloroethylene
Volatile Organic Compounds
Solid Phase Microextraction
trichloroethylene
chloroform
Volatilization
volatilization
enthalpy
toluene
water
nonlinearity

Keywords

  • Air-water partitioning
  • Heat capacity of hydration
  • Henry's law constant
  • Hydration thermodynamics
  • Solid-phase microextraction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Temperature dependence of Henry's law constant in an extended temperature range. / Görgényi, M.; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman.

In: Chemosphere, Vol. 48, No. 7, 2002, p. 757-762.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Görgényi, M. ; Dewulf, Jo ; Van Langenhove, Herman. / Temperature dependence of Henry's law constant in an extended temperature range. In: Chemosphere. 2002 ; Vol. 48, No. 7. pp. 757-762.
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AB - The Henry's law constants H for chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, trichloroethene, chlorobenzene, benzene and toluene were determined by the EPICS-SPME technique (equilibrium partitioning in closed systems - solid phase microextraction) in the temperature range 275-343 K. The curvature observed in the 1n H vs. 1/T plot was due to the temperature dependence of the change in enthalpy ΔH0 during the transfer of 1 mol solute from the aqueous solution to the gas phase. The nonlinearity of the plot was explained by means of a thermodynamic model which involves the temperature dependence of ΔH0 of the compounds and the thermal expansion of water in the three-parameter equation In (HΡTT) = A2/T + BTB + C2, where ΡT is the density of water at temperature T, TB = 1n(T/298) + (298 - T)/T, A2 = -ΔH2980/R, ΔH2980 is the ΔH0 value at 298 K, B = ΔCP0/R, and C2 is a constant. ACp0 is the molar heat capacity change in volatilization from the aqueous solution. A statistical comparison of the two models demonstrates the superiority of the three-parameter equation over the two-parameter one 1n H vs. 1/T). The new, three-parameter equation allows a more accurate description of the temperature dependence of H, and of the solubility of volatile organic compounds in water at higher temperatures.

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