Temperature and saturation dependence in the vapor sensing of butterfly wing scales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The sensing of gasses/vapors in the ambient air is the focus of attention due to the need to monitor our everyday environment. Photonic crystals are sensing materials of the future because of their strong light-manipulating properties. Natural photonic structures are well-suited materials for testing detection principles because they are significantly cheaper than artificial photonic structures and are available in larger sizes. Additionally, natural photonic structures may provide new ideas for developing novel artificial photonic nanoarchitectures with improved properties. In the present paper, we discuss the effects arising from the sensor temperature and the vapor concentration in air during measurements with a photonic crystal-type optical gas sensor. Our results shed light on the sources of discrepancy between simulated and experimental sensing behaviors of photonic crystal-type structures. Through capillary condensation, the vapors will condensate to a liquid state inside the nanocavities. Due to the temperature and radius of curvature dependence of capillary condensation, the measured signals are affected by the sensor temperature as well as by the presence of a nanocavity size distribution. The sensing materials used are natural photonic nanoarchitectures present in the wing scales of blue butterflies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-226
Number of pages6
JournalMaterials Science and Engineering C
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2014

Fingerprint

Optics and Photonics
Butterflies
wings
Photonics
Vapors
photonics
vapors
saturation
temperature dependence
Photonic crystals
Temperature
Temperature sensors
Condensation
temperature sensors
Optical sensors
Air
Chemical sensors
condensation
crystals
Materials Testing

Keywords

  • Butterfly
  • Gas sensor
  • Nanoarchitecture
  • Photonic crystal
  • Wing scale

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "The sensing of gasses/vapors in the ambient air is the focus of attention due to the need to monitor our everyday environment. Photonic crystals are sensing materials of the future because of their strong light-manipulating properties. Natural photonic structures are well-suited materials for testing detection principles because they are significantly cheaper than artificial photonic structures and are available in larger sizes. Additionally, natural photonic structures may provide new ideas for developing novel artificial photonic nanoarchitectures with improved properties. In the present paper, we discuss the effects arising from the sensor temperature and the vapor concentration in air during measurements with a photonic crystal-type optical gas sensor. Our results shed light on the sources of discrepancy between simulated and experimental sensing behaviors of photonic crystal-type structures. Through capillary condensation, the vapors will condensate to a liquid state inside the nanocavities. Due to the temperature and radius of curvature dependence of capillary condensation, the measured signals are affected by the sensor temperature as well as by the presence of a nanocavity size distribution. The sensing materials used are natural photonic nanoarchitectures present in the wing scales of blue butterflies.",
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AU - Jakab, E.

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AU - Bíró, L.

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