Temperament and personality dimensions in suicidal and nonsuicidal psychiatric inpatients

Maurizio Pompili, Z. Ríhmer, Hagop S. Akiskal, Marco Innamorati, Paolo Iliceto, Kareen K. Akiskal, David Lester, Valentina Narciso, Stefano Ferracuti, Roberto Tatarelli, Eleonora De Pisa, Paolo Girardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Suicide is a serious public health problem. In the international literature there is evidence to support the notion that certain temperaments and personality traits are often associated with suicidal behavior. Sampling and Methods: In this study, 150 psychiatric inpatients were investigated using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego autoquestionnaire, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, 2nd edition (MMPI-2) and the Beck Hopelessness Scale and evaluated for suicide risk by means of the critical items of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Results: Statistical analysis, including logistic regression analysis and multiple regression analysis, showed that suicide risk contributed to the prediction of hopelessness. Among the temperaments, only the hyperthymic temperament, as a protective factor, and the dysthymic/cyclothymic/anxious temperament contributed significantly to the prediction of hopelessness. Irritable temperament and social introversion were predictive factors for suicidal risk. Hopelessness and depression were associated with higher suicidal behavior and ideation, but, unexpectedly, depression as measured by the MMPI did not contribute significantly to the multiple regressions. Conclusions: The present study indicated that, although suicidal psychiatric patients have MMPI-2 profiles in the pathological range, they exhibit several differences from nonsuicidal patients. Patients at risk of suicide have specific temperaments as well as personality and defense mechanism profiles. They are more socially introverted, depressed and psychasthenic, and use hysterical and schizoid mechanisms more often. Generalizability of the findings was limited by the small sample size and the mix of bipolar disorder I, bipolar disorder II, major depressive disorder and psychotic disorder patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-321
Number of pages9
JournalPsychopathology
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008

Fingerprint

Temperament
Psychiatry
Personality
Inpatients
Suicide
MMPI
Bipolar Disorder
Regression Analysis
Depression
Suicidal Ideation
Major Depressive Disorder
Paris
Defense Mechanisms
Psychotic Disorders
Sample Size
Public Health
Logistic Models
Interviews

Keywords

  • Personality traits
  • Suicide
  • Temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Pompili, M., Ríhmer, Z., Akiskal, H. S., Innamorati, M., Iliceto, P., Akiskal, K. K., ... Girardi, P. (2008). Temperament and personality dimensions in suicidal and nonsuicidal psychiatric inpatients. Psychopathology, 41(5), 313-321. https://doi.org/10.1159/000146069

Temperament and personality dimensions in suicidal and nonsuicidal psychiatric inpatients. / Pompili, Maurizio; Ríhmer, Z.; Akiskal, Hagop S.; Innamorati, Marco; Iliceto, Paolo; Akiskal, Kareen K.; Lester, David; Narciso, Valentina; Ferracuti, Stefano; Tatarelli, Roberto; De Pisa, Eleonora; Girardi, Paolo.

In: Psychopathology, Vol. 41, No. 5, 08.2008, p. 313-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pompili, M, Ríhmer, Z, Akiskal, HS, Innamorati, M, Iliceto, P, Akiskal, KK, Lester, D, Narciso, V, Ferracuti, S, Tatarelli, R, De Pisa, E & Girardi, P 2008, 'Temperament and personality dimensions in suicidal and nonsuicidal psychiatric inpatients', Psychopathology, vol. 41, no. 5, pp. 313-321. https://doi.org/10.1159/000146069
Pompili, Maurizio ; Ríhmer, Z. ; Akiskal, Hagop S. ; Innamorati, Marco ; Iliceto, Paolo ; Akiskal, Kareen K. ; Lester, David ; Narciso, Valentina ; Ferracuti, Stefano ; Tatarelli, Roberto ; De Pisa, Eleonora ; Girardi, Paolo. / Temperament and personality dimensions in suicidal and nonsuicidal psychiatric inpatients. In: Psychopathology. 2008 ; Vol. 41, No. 5. pp. 313-321.
@article{ad0f2c1573494beb9b14190d56eb2e0b,
title = "Temperament and personality dimensions in suicidal and nonsuicidal psychiatric inpatients",
abstract = "Background: Suicide is a serious public health problem. In the international literature there is evidence to support the notion that certain temperaments and personality traits are often associated with suicidal behavior. Sampling and Methods: In this study, 150 psychiatric inpatients were investigated using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego autoquestionnaire, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, 2nd edition (MMPI-2) and the Beck Hopelessness Scale and evaluated for suicide risk by means of the critical items of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Results: Statistical analysis, including logistic regression analysis and multiple regression analysis, showed that suicide risk contributed to the prediction of hopelessness. Among the temperaments, only the hyperthymic temperament, as a protective factor, and the dysthymic/cyclothymic/anxious temperament contributed significantly to the prediction of hopelessness. Irritable temperament and social introversion were predictive factors for suicidal risk. Hopelessness and depression were associated with higher suicidal behavior and ideation, but, unexpectedly, depression as measured by the MMPI did not contribute significantly to the multiple regressions. Conclusions: The present study indicated that, although suicidal psychiatric patients have MMPI-2 profiles in the pathological range, they exhibit several differences from nonsuicidal patients. Patients at risk of suicide have specific temperaments as well as personality and defense mechanism profiles. They are more socially introverted, depressed and psychasthenic, and use hysterical and schizoid mechanisms more often. Generalizability of the findings was limited by the small sample size and the mix of bipolar disorder I, bipolar disorder II, major depressive disorder and psychotic disorder patients.",
keywords = "Personality traits, Suicide, Temperament",
author = "Maurizio Pompili and Z. R{\'i}hmer and Akiskal, {Hagop S.} and Marco Innamorati and Paolo Iliceto and Akiskal, {Kareen K.} and David Lester and Valentina Narciso and Stefano Ferracuti and Roberto Tatarelli and {De Pisa}, Eleonora and Paolo Girardi",
year = "2008",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1159/000146069",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "313--321",
journal = "Psychopathology",
issn = "0254-4962",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Temperament and personality dimensions in suicidal and nonsuicidal psychiatric inpatients

AU - Pompili, Maurizio

AU - Ríhmer, Z.

AU - Akiskal, Hagop S.

AU - Innamorati, Marco

AU - Iliceto, Paolo

AU - Akiskal, Kareen K.

AU - Lester, David

AU - Narciso, Valentina

AU - Ferracuti, Stefano

AU - Tatarelli, Roberto

AU - De Pisa, Eleonora

AU - Girardi, Paolo

PY - 2008/8

Y1 - 2008/8

N2 - Background: Suicide is a serious public health problem. In the international literature there is evidence to support the notion that certain temperaments and personality traits are often associated with suicidal behavior. Sampling and Methods: In this study, 150 psychiatric inpatients were investigated using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego autoquestionnaire, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, 2nd edition (MMPI-2) and the Beck Hopelessness Scale and evaluated for suicide risk by means of the critical items of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Results: Statistical analysis, including logistic regression analysis and multiple regression analysis, showed that suicide risk contributed to the prediction of hopelessness. Among the temperaments, only the hyperthymic temperament, as a protective factor, and the dysthymic/cyclothymic/anxious temperament contributed significantly to the prediction of hopelessness. Irritable temperament and social introversion were predictive factors for suicidal risk. Hopelessness and depression were associated with higher suicidal behavior and ideation, but, unexpectedly, depression as measured by the MMPI did not contribute significantly to the multiple regressions. Conclusions: The present study indicated that, although suicidal psychiatric patients have MMPI-2 profiles in the pathological range, they exhibit several differences from nonsuicidal patients. Patients at risk of suicide have specific temperaments as well as personality and defense mechanism profiles. They are more socially introverted, depressed and psychasthenic, and use hysterical and schizoid mechanisms more often. Generalizability of the findings was limited by the small sample size and the mix of bipolar disorder I, bipolar disorder II, major depressive disorder and psychotic disorder patients.

AB - Background: Suicide is a serious public health problem. In the international literature there is evidence to support the notion that certain temperaments and personality traits are often associated with suicidal behavior. Sampling and Methods: In this study, 150 psychiatric inpatients were investigated using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego autoquestionnaire, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, 2nd edition (MMPI-2) and the Beck Hopelessness Scale and evaluated for suicide risk by means of the critical items of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Results: Statistical analysis, including logistic regression analysis and multiple regression analysis, showed that suicide risk contributed to the prediction of hopelessness. Among the temperaments, only the hyperthymic temperament, as a protective factor, and the dysthymic/cyclothymic/anxious temperament contributed significantly to the prediction of hopelessness. Irritable temperament and social introversion were predictive factors for suicidal risk. Hopelessness and depression were associated with higher suicidal behavior and ideation, but, unexpectedly, depression as measured by the MMPI did not contribute significantly to the multiple regressions. Conclusions: The present study indicated that, although suicidal psychiatric patients have MMPI-2 profiles in the pathological range, they exhibit several differences from nonsuicidal patients. Patients at risk of suicide have specific temperaments as well as personality and defense mechanism profiles. They are more socially introverted, depressed and psychasthenic, and use hysterical and schizoid mechanisms more often. Generalizability of the findings was limited by the small sample size and the mix of bipolar disorder I, bipolar disorder II, major depressive disorder and psychotic disorder patients.

KW - Personality traits

KW - Suicide

KW - Temperament

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=47149088121&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=47149088121&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000146069

DO - 10.1159/000146069

M3 - Article

C2 - 18635934

AN - SCOPUS:47149088121

VL - 41

SP - 313

EP - 321

JO - Psychopathology

JF - Psychopathology

SN - 0254-4962

IS - 5

ER -