Targeting blood vessels for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

Ethan Amir, Sarah Hughes, Fiona Blackhall, Nick Thatcher, G. Ostoros, J. Tímár, J. Tóvári, Gabor Kovacs, B. Döme

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although modest survival benefit has been observed with surgery, radiotherapy and platinum-based chemotherapy, an efficacy plateau has been reached. It has become obvious, therefore, that additional treatments are needed in order to provide an improved survival benefit for these patients. The use of molecular targeted therapies, particularly those against tumor capillaries, has the potential to improve outcomes for NSCLC patients. Bevacizumab, a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), is the first targeted drug that has shown survival advantage when combined with chemotherapy in NSCLC. Other antivascular agents, including vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) and different small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have also shown promise in phase I and II trials in NSCLC. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical properties of these drugs and to discuss the evidence that supports their use in the treatment of NSCLC. Furthermore, we plan to review the main pitfalls of antivascular strategies in NSCLC cancer therapy as well as assess the future direction of these treatment methods with an emphasis on clarifying the molecular background of the effects of these drugs and defining the biomarkers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)392-403
Number of pages12
JournalCurrent Cancer Drug Targets
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Blood Vessels
Survival
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Molecular Targeted Therapy
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Platinum
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Radiotherapy
Biomarkers
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Targeting blood vessels for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. / Amir, Ethan; Hughes, Sarah; Blackhall, Fiona; Thatcher, Nick; Ostoros, G.; Tímár, J.; Tóvári, J.; Kovacs, Gabor; Döme, B.

In: Current Cancer Drug Targets, Vol. 8, No. 5, 08.2008, p. 392-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Amir, Ethan ; Hughes, Sarah ; Blackhall, Fiona ; Thatcher, Nick ; Ostoros, G. ; Tímár, J. ; Tóvári, J. ; Kovacs, Gabor ; Döme, B. / Targeting blood vessels for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. In: Current Cancer Drug Targets. 2008 ; Vol. 8, No. 5. pp. 392-403.
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