Targeted phototherapy of plaque-type psoriasis using ultraviolet B-light-emitting diodes

L. Kemény, Z. Csoma, E. Bagdi, A. H. Banham, L. Krenács, A. Koreck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background One of the major technological breakthroughs in the last decade is represented by the diversified medical applications of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). LEDs emitting in the ultraviolet (UV) B spectrum might serve as a more convenient alternative for targeted delivery of phototherapy in inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis. Objectives We investigated the efficacy and safety of a new UVB-LED phototherapeutic device in chronic plaque-type psoriasis. Methods Twenty patients with stable plaque-type psoriasis were enrolled into a prospective, right-left comparative, open study. Symmetrical lesions located on extremities or trunk were chosen; one lesion was treated with the study device, whereas the other lesion served as an untreated control. Two treatment regimens were used in the study, one with an aggressive dose escalation similar to those used for outpatient treatment and one with slow increase in dose, similar to those used for treatment at home. Results Patients in both groups responded rapidly to the UVB-LED therapy. Early disease resolution was observed in 11 patients (seven in the first group and four in the second group). Overall improvement at end of therapy was 93% in the high-dose group and 84% in the low-dose group. Four patients from the high-dose group and five from the low-dose group were still in remission at the 6-month follow-up visit. Conclusions These results suggest that this innovative UVB-LED device is effective in the treatment of localized psoriasis and may be useful in other UV-responsive skin diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-173
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Dermatology
Volume163
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

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Phototherapy
Ultraviolet Rays
Psoriasis
Light
Skin Diseases
Equipment and Supplies
Therapeutics
Outpatients
Extremities
Safety

Keywords

  • light-emitting diodes
  • phototherapy
  • psoriasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Targeted phototherapy of plaque-type psoriasis using ultraviolet B-light-emitting diodes. / Kemény, L.; Csoma, Z.; Bagdi, E.; Banham, A. H.; Krenács, L.; Koreck, A.

In: British Journal of Dermatology, Vol. 163, No. 1, 07.2010, p. 167-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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