System level mechanisms of adaptation, learning, memory formation and evolvability: The role of chaperone and other networks

Dávid M. Gyurkó, Csaba Soti, Attila Steták, Peter Csermely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the last decade, network approaches became a powerful tool to describe protein structure and dynamics. Here, we describe first the protein structure networks of molecular chaperones, then characterize chaperone containing sub-networks of interactomes called as chaperone-networks or chaperomes. We review the role of molecular chaperones in short-term adaptation of cellular networks in response to stress, and in long-term adaptation discussing their putative functions in the regulation of evolvability. We provide a general overview of possible network mechanisms of adaptation, learning and memory formation. We propose that changes of network rigidity play a key role in learning and memory formation processes. Flexible network topology provides 'learning-competent' state. Here, networks may have much less modular boundaries than locally rigid, highly modular networks, where the learnt information has already been consolidated in a memory formation process. Since modular boundaries are efficient filters of information, in the 'learningcompetent' state information filtering may be much smaller, than after memory formation. This mechanism restricts high information transfer to the 'learning competent' state. After memory formation, modular boundary-induced segregation and information filtering protect the stored information. The flexible networks of young organisms are generally in a 'learning competent' state. On the contrary, locally rigid networks of old organisms have lost their 'learning competent' state, but store and protect their learnt information efficiently. We anticipate that the above mechanism may operate at the level of both protein-protein interaction and neuronal networks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-188
Number of pages18
JournalCurrent Protein and Peptide Science
Volume15
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Learning
Data storage equipment
Information filtering
Molecular Chaperones
Proteins
Protein Interaction Maps
Information Services
Rigidity
Topology

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Chaperones
  • Evolution
  • Heat shock proteins
  • Learning
  • Memory
  • Protein structure networks
  • Protein-protein interaction networks
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

System level mechanisms of adaptation, learning, memory formation and evolvability : The role of chaperone and other networks. / Gyurkó, Dávid M.; Soti, Csaba; Steták, Attila; Csermely, Peter.

In: Current Protein and Peptide Science, Vol. 15, No. 3, 2014, p. 171-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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