Synthesizing flexible process networks by two stage p-graphs

Eva Konig, Karoly Kalauz, B. Bertók

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Daily competitiveness of a process system highly depends on its flexibility, i.e., how the operation can follow the actual market. However, those processes are seldom flexible, which were not designed and constructed to be. The present paper review different approaches for synthesizing robust process networks, e.g., stochastic optimization (Birge and Louveaux, 2011), stochastic LP optimization (Kall and Mayer, 2005), two stage stochastic MIP optimization (Qin et al., 2013) and the forced incorporation of redundancies in process systems (Bertok et al., 2013). Two stages of the models are distinguished according to the two levels of decisions, i.e., level one for figuring out the investments and level two for controlling the operation. At level one operating units are selected to be involved in the investments and capacities of them are determined according to the estimated future circumstances. At level two start ups, shut downs, and optimal loads of the operating units are defined in agreements with real situations. In the current examination both stages, as well as their relations, are represented by process graphs or P-graphs originally introduced by Friedler et al. (1992) for chemical process design. Optimal decisions are computed according to two stage stochastic optimization, where expected alternative scenarios at level two helps evaluating the consequences of the decisions at level one. As an alternative approach robust systems are to be synthesized by forced installation of redundant capacities. Effectiveness of the methods is illustrated by applying them to supply chain design.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1339-1344
Number of pages6
JournalComputer Aided Chemical Engineering
Volume33
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Supply chains
Redundancy
Process design

Keywords

  • P-graph
  • PNS
  • Process network synthesis
  • Redundant structures
  • Stochastic optimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Synthesizing flexible process networks by two stage p-graphs. / Konig, Eva; Kalauz, Karoly; Bertók, B.

In: Computer Aided Chemical Engineering, Vol. 33, 2014, p. 1339-1344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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