Synteny and comparative genomics between model and cool season grain legumes

Péter Kaló, Hong Kyu Choi, Noel Ellis, G. Kiss

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Legumes are second only to the Gramineae in their importance to humans. Traditionally used as a source of proteins and nitrogen in both natural and agricultural ecosystems, legumes account for nearly 30% of the world’s primary crop production. These factors have stimulated the development of legume genomic resources over the past decades. Despite the progress achieved in two model species, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, and the long history in genetic studies in pea, relatively little genomic information is available for cool season grain legumes. Among the available genomic approaches, comparative genetic mapping is especially important for species with large and complex genome organization such as legume crops. Mapping of orthologous genes has identifi ed large scale conservation between the genomes of galegoid legumes (often referred as temperate or cool season legumes), as well as chromosomal rearrangements that, in some cases, underlie the variation in chromosome number between these species. Because of the limited availability of large-scale genomic sequences in cool season grain legumes, this chapter focuses on comparative mapping between the most important cool season grain legumes at macrosynteny level. Results achieved so far suggest that the knowledge gained from comparative mapping may have considerable utility to solve basic and applied agronomic questions of importance in the crop species.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGenetics, Genomics and Breeding of Cool Season Grain Legumes
PublisherCRC Press
Pages285-302
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781439883396
ISBN (Print)9781578087655
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Synteny
Genomics
Fabaceae
legumes
Crops
genomics
Genes
Chromosomes
Ecosystems
Conservation
chromosome mapping
Availability
Nitrogen
Proteins
Medicago truncatula
Genome
Lotus corniculatus var. japonicus
genome
Chromosome Mapping
Peas

Keywords

  • Breeding
  • Comparative mapping
  • Grain legumes
  • Intron-targeted PCR-based markers
  • Model legumes
  • Orthologous regions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Kaló, P., Choi, H. K., Ellis, N., & Kiss, G. (2011). Synteny and comparative genomics between model and cool season grain legumes. In Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Cool Season Grain Legumes (pp. 285-302). CRC Press.

Synteny and comparative genomics between model and cool season grain legumes. / Kaló, Péter; Choi, Hong Kyu; Ellis, Noel; Kiss, G.

Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Cool Season Grain Legumes. CRC Press, 2011. p. 285-302.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kaló, P, Choi, HK, Ellis, N & Kiss, G 2011, Synteny and comparative genomics between model and cool season grain legumes. in Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Cool Season Grain Legumes. CRC Press, pp. 285-302.
Kaló P, Choi HK, Ellis N, Kiss G. Synteny and comparative genomics between model and cool season grain legumes. In Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Cool Season Grain Legumes. CRC Press. 2011. p. 285-302
Kaló, Péter ; Choi, Hong Kyu ; Ellis, Noel ; Kiss, G. / Synteny and comparative genomics between model and cool season grain legumes. Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Cool Season Grain Legumes. CRC Press, 2011. pp. 285-302
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