Symptom profiles and parental bonding in homicidal versus non-violent male schizophrenia patients

Tamás Halmai, T. Tényi, X. Gonda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective - To compare the intensity and the profile of psychotic symptoms and the characteristics of parental bonding of male schizophrenia patients with a history of homicide and those without a history of violent behaviour. Clinical question - We hypothesized more intense psychotic symptoms, especially positive symptoms as signs of a more severe psychopathology in the background of homicidal behaviour. We also hypothesized a more negatively perceived pattern (less Care more Overprotection) of parental bonding in the case of homicidal schizophrenia patients than in non-violent patients and non-violent healthy controls. Method and subjects - Symptom severity and symptom profiles were assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale in a group of male schizophrenia patients (n=22) with the history of committed or attempted homicide, and another group (n = 19) of male schizophrenia patients without a history of violent behaviour. Care- and Overprotection were assessed using the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) in a third group of non-violent healthy controls (n=20), too. Results - Positive, negative and general psychopathology symptoms in the homicidal schizophrenia group were significantly (p<0.005) more severe than in the non-violent schizophrenia group. Non-violent schizophrenia patients scored lower on Care and higher on Overprotection than violent patients and healthy controls. Homicidal schizophrenia patients showed a pattern similar to the one in the healthy control group. Conclusions - It seems imperative to register intense positive psychotic symptoms as predictive markers for later violent behaviour. In the subgroup of male homicidal schizophrenia patients negatively experienced parental bonding does not appear to be major contributing factor to later homicidal behaviour.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-52
Number of pages10
JournalIdeggyogyaszati Szemle
Volume70
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 30 2017

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Schizophrenia
Homicide
Psychopathology
Object Attachment
Signs and Symptoms
History
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Homicide
  • Parental bonding
  • Schizophrenia
  • Symptom severity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Symptom profiles and parental bonding in homicidal versus non-violent male schizophrenia patients. / Halmai, Tamás; Tényi, T.; Gonda, X.

In: Ideggyogyaszati Szemle, Vol. 70, No. 1-2, 30.01.2017, p. 43-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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