Symmetry in Crystallography

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The science of crystals involves symmetry. Symmetry is also an excellent link to other fields of human endeavor. The first scientific crystallographer, Johannes Kepler, came to the idea of close packing when he was considering the symmetry of snow crystals. When Louis Pasteur observed crystal and molecular chirality, he opened a Pandora's box of the notion of the dissymmetry of the universe. Since the start of X-ray crystallography in 1912, emphasis has been on single-crystal symmetry, and the field has moved from triumph to triumph. In the late 1920s, however, interest in less than perfect structures developed, leading to the establishment of molecular biology. Helical symmetries were found to characterize life's most important molecules. Symmetry considerations were decisive in these discoveries, which stimulated the expansion of the symmetry concept. In the mid-1980s, the belief that fivefold symmetry was a noncrystallographic symmetry crumbled, and the concept of the crystal had to be revised. Crystallography has now become the science of structures. Symmetry has helped crystallography to influence the arts. This tends to unify our culture - a side effect of the enormous work of uncovering the secrets of matter for the betterment of human life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)697-706
Number of pages10
JournalActa Crystallographica Section A: Foundations of Crystallography
Volume54
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 1998

Fingerprint

Crystallography
Crystal symmetry
crystallography
Snow
X Ray Crystallography
symmetry
Art
Molecular Biology
Crystals
Molecular biology
Chirality
X ray crystallography
crystals
molecular biology
Single crystals
arts
snow
Molecules
chirality
universe

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Structural Biology

Cite this

Symmetry in Crystallography. / Hargittai, I.

In: Acta Crystallographica Section A: Foundations of Crystallography, Vol. 54, No. 6, 01.11.1998, p. 697-706.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d50330e7f4204df7935e18a8d6e69d02,
title = "Symmetry in Crystallography",
abstract = "The science of crystals involves symmetry. Symmetry is also an excellent link to other fields of human endeavor. The first scientific crystallographer, Johannes Kepler, came to the idea of close packing when he was considering the symmetry of snow crystals. When Louis Pasteur observed crystal and molecular chirality, he opened a Pandora's box of the notion of the dissymmetry of the universe. Since the start of X-ray crystallography in 1912, emphasis has been on single-crystal symmetry, and the field has moved from triumph to triumph. In the late 1920s, however, interest in less than perfect structures developed, leading to the establishment of molecular biology. Helical symmetries were found to characterize life's most important molecules. Symmetry considerations were decisive in these discoveries, which stimulated the expansion of the symmetry concept. In the mid-1980s, the belief that fivefold symmetry was a noncrystallographic symmetry crumbled, and the concept of the crystal had to be revised. Crystallography has now become the science of structures. Symmetry has helped crystallography to influence the arts. This tends to unify our culture - a side effect of the enormous work of uncovering the secrets of matter for the betterment of human life.",
author = "I. Hargittai",
year = "1998",
month = "11",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "54",
pages = "697--706",
journal = "Acta Crystallographica Section A: Foundations and Advances",
issn = "0108-7673",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Symmetry in Crystallography

AU - Hargittai, I.

PY - 1998/11/1

Y1 - 1998/11/1

N2 - The science of crystals involves symmetry. Symmetry is also an excellent link to other fields of human endeavor. The first scientific crystallographer, Johannes Kepler, came to the idea of close packing when he was considering the symmetry of snow crystals. When Louis Pasteur observed crystal and molecular chirality, he opened a Pandora's box of the notion of the dissymmetry of the universe. Since the start of X-ray crystallography in 1912, emphasis has been on single-crystal symmetry, and the field has moved from triumph to triumph. In the late 1920s, however, interest in less than perfect structures developed, leading to the establishment of molecular biology. Helical symmetries were found to characterize life's most important molecules. Symmetry considerations were decisive in these discoveries, which stimulated the expansion of the symmetry concept. In the mid-1980s, the belief that fivefold symmetry was a noncrystallographic symmetry crumbled, and the concept of the crystal had to be revised. Crystallography has now become the science of structures. Symmetry has helped crystallography to influence the arts. This tends to unify our culture - a side effect of the enormous work of uncovering the secrets of matter for the betterment of human life.

AB - The science of crystals involves symmetry. Symmetry is also an excellent link to other fields of human endeavor. The first scientific crystallographer, Johannes Kepler, came to the idea of close packing when he was considering the symmetry of snow crystals. When Louis Pasteur observed crystal and molecular chirality, he opened a Pandora's box of the notion of the dissymmetry of the universe. Since the start of X-ray crystallography in 1912, emphasis has been on single-crystal symmetry, and the field has moved from triumph to triumph. In the late 1920s, however, interest in less than perfect structures developed, leading to the establishment of molecular biology. Helical symmetries were found to characterize life's most important molecules. Symmetry considerations were decisive in these discoveries, which stimulated the expansion of the symmetry concept. In the mid-1980s, the belief that fivefold symmetry was a noncrystallographic symmetry crumbled, and the concept of the crystal had to be revised. Crystallography has now become the science of structures. Symmetry has helped crystallography to influence the arts. This tends to unify our culture - a side effect of the enormous work of uncovering the secrets of matter for the betterment of human life.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0542396602&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0542396602&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0542396602

VL - 54

SP - 697

EP - 706

JO - Acta Crystallographica Section A: Foundations and Advances

JF - Acta Crystallographica Section A: Foundations and Advances

SN - 0108-7673

IS - 6

ER -