Survivin promoter polymorphism and cervical carcinogenesis

A. A. Borbéry, M. Murvai, K. Szarka, J. Kónya, L. Gergely, Z. Hernádi, G. Veress

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Survivin, a novel member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family, plays an important role in cell cycle regulation. A common polymorphism at the survivin gene promoter (G/C at position 31) was shown to be correlated with survivin gene expression in cancer cell lines. Aim: To investigate whether this polymorphism could be involved in the development of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical carcinoma. Methods: Survivin promoter polymorphism was detected in patients with cervical cancer, in patients with equivocal cytological atypia and in a control population using polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis. HPV was typed in patients with cervical cancer and cytological atypia using PCR-RFLP. Results: No statistically significant differences were found in the genotype distributions of the survivin promoter variants among our study groups. Conclusions: The survivin promoter polymorphism at position 31 may not represent an increased risk for the development of cervical cancer, at least in the population studied here.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-306
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Pathology
Volume60
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2007

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Carcinogenesis
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
Human Development
Population
Cell Cycle
Genotype
Apoptosis
Carcinoma
Gene Expression
Cell Line
Genes
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Survivin promoter polymorphism and cervical carcinogenesis. / Borbéry, A. A.; Murvai, M.; Szarka, K.; Kónya, J.; Gergely, L.; Hernádi, Z.; Veress, G.

In: Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 60, No. 3, 03.2007, p. 303-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Borbéry, A. A.

AU - Murvai, M.

AU - Szarka, K.

AU - Kónya, J.

AU - Gergely, L.

AU - Hernádi, Z.

AU - Veress, G.

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N2 - Background: Survivin, a novel member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family, plays an important role in cell cycle regulation. A common polymorphism at the survivin gene promoter (G/C at position 31) was shown to be correlated with survivin gene expression in cancer cell lines. Aim: To investigate whether this polymorphism could be involved in the development of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical carcinoma. Methods: Survivin promoter polymorphism was detected in patients with cervical cancer, in patients with equivocal cytological atypia and in a control population using polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis. HPV was typed in patients with cervical cancer and cytological atypia using PCR-RFLP. Results: No statistically significant differences were found in the genotype distributions of the survivin promoter variants among our study groups. Conclusions: The survivin promoter polymorphism at position 31 may not represent an increased risk for the development of cervical cancer, at least in the population studied here.

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