Robotikai eszközök az idegsebészet szolgá latában

Translated title of the contribution: Surgical robotics in neurosurgery

Tamás Haidegger, Zoltán Benyó

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Surgical robotics is one of the most dynamically advancing areas of biomedical engineering. In the past few decades, computer-integrated interventional medicine has gained significance internationally in the field of surgical procedures. More recently, mechatronic devices have been used for nephrectomy, cholecystectomy, as well as in orthopedics and radiosurgery. Estimates show that 70% of the radical prostatectomies were performed with the da Vinci robot in the United States last year. Robot-aided procedures offer remarkable advantages in neurosurgery both for the patient and the surgeon, making microsurgery and Minimally Invasive Surgery a reality, and even complete teleoperation accessible. This paper introduces surgical robotic systems developed primarily for brain and spine applications, besides, it focuses on the different research strategies applied to provide smarter, better and more advanced tools to surgeons. A new system is discussed in details that we have developed together with the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. This cooperatively-controlled system can assist with skull base drilling to improve the safety and quality of neurosurgery while reducing the operating time. The paper presents the entire system, the preliminary results of phantom and cadaver tests and our efforts to improve the accuracy of the components. An effective optical tracking based patient motion compensation method has been implemented and tested. The results verify the effectiveness of the system and allow for further research.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)1701-1711
Number of pages11
JournalOrvosi Hetilap
Volume150
Issue number36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2009

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Neurosurgery
Robotics
Patient Identification Systems
Biomedical Engineering
Baltimore
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Microsurgery
Radiosurgery
Skull Base
Cholecystectomy
Prostatectomy
Nephrectomy
Cadaver
Research
Orthopedics
Spine
Medicine
Safety
Equipment and Supplies
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Robotikai eszközök az idegsebészet szolgá latában. / Haidegger, Tamás; Benyó, Zoltán.

In: Orvosi Hetilap, Vol. 150, No. 36, 01.09.2009, p. 1701-1711.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haidegger, Tamás ; Benyó, Zoltán. / Robotikai eszközök az idegsebészet szolgá latában. In: Orvosi Hetilap. 2009 ; Vol. 150, No. 36. pp. 1701-1711.
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