Surgery and sepsis increase somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the human plasma

Balazs Suto, Terez Bagoly, Rita Borzsei, Orsolya Lengl, J. Szolcsányi, Timea Nemeth, Csaba Loibl, Zsofia Bardonicsek, E. Pintér, Z. Helyes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have previously shown in animals that somatostatin released from capsaicin-sensitive afferents in response to inflammation and tissue damage exerts systemic anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory actions. Since peptidergic sensory innervation of the airways and the joints are particularly dense, we aimed at investigating the alterations of plasma somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SST-LI) in response to thoracic and orthopedic surgery, as well as sepsis. Thoracotomy, video-assisted thoracoscopy, hip and knee endoprosthesis were performed under general anesthesia. Blood was taken before, during and after the surgical procedures, as well as at admission and every consecutive morning from septic patients receiving exclusively total parenteral nutrition. SST-LI was determined from the plasma with specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay developed in our laboratory. Plasma SST-LI in healthy volunteers and preoperatively was 8-12 fmol/ml. Both thoracotomy and thoracoscopy significantly increased SST-LI by 55-60% at the end of the procedures when the thoracic cavity and the skin were closed. Hip endoprosthesis implantation elevated SST-LI by 30% after skin incision, which increased further to 55% by the time the surgery was completed. In contrast, knee operations performed under tourniquet did not alter SST-LI in the systemic circulation. SST-LI was almost 3-fold higher in the plasma of septic patients than in healthy volunteers. This human study revealed that thoracic/hip surgery and sepsis elevate SST-LI in the systemic circulation, presumably by inducing its release from sensory fibres. It is concluded, that the endogenous protective mechanism mediated by neural somatostatin, which has been evidenced in animals, is likely to operate in patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1208-1212
Number of pages5
JournalPeptides
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Plasma (human)
Surgery
Sepsis
Plasmas
Hip
Thoracoscopy
Thoracotomy
Somatostatin
Thoracic Surgery
Knee
Skin
Healthy Volunteers
Animals
Thoracic Cavity
Tourniquets
somatostatin-like peptides
Total Parenteral Nutrition
Capsaicin
Orthopedics
Nutrition

Keywords

  • Radioimmunoassay
  • Sensory nerves
  • Sepsis
  • Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity
  • Thoracic and orthopedic surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Surgery and sepsis increase somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the human plasma. / Suto, Balazs; Bagoly, Terez; Borzsei, Rita; Lengl, Orsolya; Szolcsányi, J.; Nemeth, Timea; Loibl, Csaba; Bardonicsek, Zsofia; Pintér, E.; Helyes, Z.

In: Peptides, Vol. 31, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 1208-1212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suto, B, Bagoly, T, Borzsei, R, Lengl, O, Szolcsányi, J, Nemeth, T, Loibl, C, Bardonicsek, Z, Pintér, E & Helyes, Z 2010, 'Surgery and sepsis increase somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the human plasma', Peptides, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 1208-1212. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.peptides.2010.03.018
Suto, Balazs ; Bagoly, Terez ; Borzsei, Rita ; Lengl, Orsolya ; Szolcsányi, J. ; Nemeth, Timea ; Loibl, Csaba ; Bardonicsek, Zsofia ; Pintér, E. ; Helyes, Z. / Surgery and sepsis increase somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the human plasma. In: Peptides. 2010 ; Vol. 31, No. 6. pp. 1208-1212.
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AU - Bagoly, Terez

AU - Borzsei, Rita

AU - Lengl, Orsolya

AU - Szolcsányi, J.

AU - Nemeth, Timea

AU - Loibl, Csaba

AU - Bardonicsek, Zsofia

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AU - Helyes, Z.

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