Surface chemistry of HNCO and NCO on Pd(100)

R. Németh, J. Kiss, F. Solymosi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The interaction of HNCO with Pd(100) has been studied with reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. Following the adsorption of HNCO at 100 K, a fraction of the adsorbed HNCO desorbs at 115-125 K and another part dissociates at 120-140 K yielding adsorbed H and NCO species. NCO locates in top-site position having significant lateral repulsive interaction between them. On clean surface, the NCO species was found to decompose readily to adsorbed CO and N on warming to 300 K. Preadsorbed oxygen atoms resulted in the significant stabilization of NCO; the asymmetric stretch of it was detected up to 380 K. Neither NCO nor HNCO were identified in the NO + CO reaction even at high pressure (1-10 mbar) and at elevated temperature (500-650 K). The presence of hydrogen did not help the formation of this species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1424-1427
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry C
Volume111
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 25 2007

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Carbon Monoxide
Surface chemistry
Absorption spectroscopy
Infrared spectroscopy
Stabilization
chemistry
Adsorption
Atoms
Hydrogen
Oxygen
oxygen atoms
absorption spectroscopy
stabilization
infrared spectroscopy
interactions
Temperature
adsorption
heating
hydrogen
temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Surface chemistry of HNCO and NCO on Pd(100). / Németh, R.; Kiss, J.; Solymosi, F.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Vol. 111, No. 3, 25.01.2007, p. 1424-1427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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