Suppressed neuronal activity and concurrent arteriolar vasoconstriction may explain negative blood oxygenation level-dependent signal

Anna Devor, Peifang Tian, Nozomi Nishimura, Ivan C. Teng, Elizabeth M C Hillman, S. N. Narayanan, I. Ulbert, David A. Boas, David Kleinfeld, Anders M. Dale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

246 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Synaptic transmission initiates a cascade of signal transduction events that couple neuronal activity to local changes in blood flow and oxygenation. Although a number of vasoactive molecules and specific cell types have been implicated, the transformation of stimulus-induced activation of neuronal circuits to hemodynamic changes is still unclear. We use somatosensory stimulation and a suite of in vivo imaging tools to study neurovascular coupling in rat primary somatosensory cortex. Our stimulus evoked a central region of net neuronal depolarization surrounded by net hyperpolarization. Hemodynamic measurements revealed that predominant depolarization corresponded to an increase in oxygenation, whereas predominant hyperpolarization corresponded to a decrease in oxygenation. On the microscopic level of single surface arterioles, the response was composed of a combination of dilatory and constrictive phases. Critically, the relative strength of vasoconstriction covaried with the relative strength of oxygenation decrease and neuronal hyperpolarization. These results suggest that a neuronal inhibition and concurrent arteriolar vasoconstriction correspond to a decrease in blood oxygenation, which would be consistent with a negative blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4452-4459
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume27
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 18 2007

Fingerprint

Vasoconstriction
Hemodynamics
Somatosensory Cortex
Arterioles
Synaptic Transmission
Signal Transduction
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Electrode array
  • Hemodynamic
  • Intrinsic imaging
  • Somatosensory
  • Two-photon
  • Voltage-sensitive dyes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Suppressed neuronal activity and concurrent arteriolar vasoconstriction may explain negative blood oxygenation level-dependent signal. / Devor, Anna; Tian, Peifang; Nishimura, Nozomi; Teng, Ivan C.; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Narayanan, S. N.; Ulbert, I.; Boas, David A.; Kleinfeld, David; Dale, Anders M.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 27, No. 16, 18.04.2007, p. 4452-4459.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Devor, A, Tian, P, Nishimura, N, Teng, IC, Hillman, EMC, Narayanan, SN, Ulbert, I, Boas, DA, Kleinfeld, D & Dale, AM 2007, 'Suppressed neuronal activity and concurrent arteriolar vasoconstriction may explain negative blood oxygenation level-dependent signal', Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 27, no. 16, pp. 4452-4459. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0134-07.2007
Devor, Anna ; Tian, Peifang ; Nishimura, Nozomi ; Teng, Ivan C. ; Hillman, Elizabeth M C ; Narayanan, S. N. ; Ulbert, I. ; Boas, David A. ; Kleinfeld, David ; Dale, Anders M. / Suppressed neuronal activity and concurrent arteriolar vasoconstriction may explain negative blood oxygenation level-dependent signal. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2007 ; Vol. 27, No. 16. pp. 4452-4459.
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