Suicide rates in Hungary correlate negatively with reported rates of depression

Z. Ríhmer, Judit Barsi, Katalin Veg, Cornelius L E Katona

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regional variations across Hungary in suicide rate and in rate of treated depression were examined. Regional differences in suicide rate as well as psychiatric morbidity were consistent over the 3 years examined (1985, 1986 and 1987). The suicide rate showed a significant negative correlation with the rate of treated depression in each of the 3 years, and weaker negative correlations with perinatal mortality and divorce rate. No correlation between suicide rate and rate of schizophrenia was found. The results suggest that underdiagnosis of depression may contribute to Hungary's very high suicide rate. The implications of this for medical education and psychiatric practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-91
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Hungary
Suicide
Depression
Psychiatry
Divorce
Perinatal Mortality
Medical Education
Schizophrenia
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Diagnosis
  • Hungary
  • Incidence of depression
  • Suicide rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Suicide rates in Hungary correlate negatively with reported rates of depression. / Ríhmer, Z.; Barsi, Judit; Veg, Katalin; Katona, Cornelius L E.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 20, No. 2, 1990, p. 87-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ríhmer, Z. ; Barsi, Judit ; Veg, Katalin ; Katona, Cornelius L E. / Suicide rates in Hungary correlate negatively with reported rates of depression. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 1990 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 87-91.
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