Subcellular compartmentation of ascorbate and its variation in disease states

G. Bánhegyi, Angelo Benedetti, Éva Margittai, Paola Marcolongo, Rosella Fulceri, Csilla E. Németh, A. Szarka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Beyond its general role as antioxidant, specific functions of ascorbate are compartmentalized within the eukaryotic cell. The list of organelle-specific functions of ascorbate has been recently expanded with the epigenetic role exerted as a cofactor for DNA and histone demethylases in the nucleus. Compartmentation necessitates the transport through intracellular membranes; members of the GLUT family and sodium-vitamin C cotransporters mediate the permeation of dehydroascorbic acid and ascorbate, respectively. Recent observations show that increased consumption and/or hindered entrance of ascorbate in/to a compartment results in pathological alterations partially resembling to scurvy, thus diseases of ascorbate compartmentation can exist. The review focuses on the reactions and transporters that can modulate ascorbate concentration and redox state in three compartments: endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nucleus. By introducing the relevant experimental and clinical findings we make an attempt to coin the term of ascorbate compartmentation disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1909-1916
Number of pages8
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Cell Research
Volume1843
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Histone Demethylases
Dehydroascorbic Acid
Scurvy
Intracellular Membranes
Numismatics
Eukaryotic Cells
Epigenomics
Endoplasmic Reticulum
Organelles
Ascorbic Acid
Oxidation-Reduction
Mitochondria
Antioxidants
Sodium
DNA

Keywords

  • Arterial tortuosity syndrome
  • Ascorbate
  • Compartmentation
  • Dehydroascorbic acid
  • GLUT
  • Scurvy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Subcellular compartmentation of ascorbate and its variation in disease states. / Bánhegyi, G.; Benedetti, Angelo; Margittai, Éva; Marcolongo, Paola; Fulceri, Rosella; Németh, Csilla E.; Szarka, A.

In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Cell Research, Vol. 1843, No. 9, 2014, p. 1909-1916.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bánhegyi, G. ; Benedetti, Angelo ; Margittai, Éva ; Marcolongo, Paola ; Fulceri, Rosella ; Németh, Csilla E. ; Szarka, A. / Subcellular compartmentation of ascorbate and its variation in disease states. In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Cell Research. 2014 ; Vol. 1843, No. 9. pp. 1909-1916.
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