Study of the hygroscopic behavior of regional background atmospheric aerosol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this work we applied the Atmospheric Inorganic Model to predict the water uptake of aerosol particles. This model was developed by S. Clegg and A. Wexler (Clegg et al., 1998). Since AIM considers only the inorganic fraction of aerosol constituents, these data are useful in the estimation of the effect of organic compounds on the hygroscopic growth of particles. In Fig. 1 the summary of predicted (by AIM) and measured water uptake of aerosol samples at 6 humidity levels (51, 64, 76, 80, 86 and 96% RH) are shown. From these data we found that predicted growth is 3.4 times larger than the measured mass growth. Although the figure contains only the data set obtained with increasing relative humidity, same conclusion can be drawn if we regard the results from decreasing relative humidity. However, the magnitude of water deficiency is significantly lower (only 1.5) in the case of decreasing RH. From these data we can assume that beside inorganic components, other aerosol constituents play also important roles in the control of water adsorption and desorption. In Fig. 2 the average size distributions of main aerosol components are presented. Ammonium and sulfate ions accumulate in 0.5-1.0 and 0.25-1.0 μm size ranges, respectively, while high nitrate concentrations are measured in the coarse size range (1-8 μm). On the other hand total carbon (TC=WINSOC+WSOC; WINSOC: water insoluble; WSOC: water soluble) content of the aerosol concentrates in the 0.125-1.0 μm size interval, with a maximum in the 0.25-0.5 gm range. The relative share of WINSOC is the highest in this interval, while in other size ranges WSOC dominates. We also note that TC fraction, compared to the mass of other constituents, is high in the 0.125-0.5 μm size range.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Aerosol Science
Volume35
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2004

Fingerprint

Atmospheric aerosols
Aerosols
aerosol
range size
Water
Atmospheric humidity
water uptake
relative humidity
Ammonium Sulfate
Organic compounds
Nitrates
water
Water content
Particles (particulate matter)
organic compound
Desorption
desorption
humidity
Carbon
ammonium

Keywords

  • Chemical composition
  • Hygroscopic properties
  • Regional background aerosol
  • Water uptake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

@article{c6d92835c7404ae99c9aa3eb030da42f,
title = "Study of the hygroscopic behavior of regional background atmospheric aerosol",
abstract = "In this work we applied the Atmospheric Inorganic Model to predict the water uptake of aerosol particles. This model was developed by S. Clegg and A. Wexler (Clegg et al., 1998). Since AIM considers only the inorganic fraction of aerosol constituents, these data are useful in the estimation of the effect of organic compounds on the hygroscopic growth of particles. In Fig. 1 the summary of predicted (by AIM) and measured water uptake of aerosol samples at 6 humidity levels (51, 64, 76, 80, 86 and 96{\%} RH) are shown. From these data we found that predicted growth is 3.4 times larger than the measured mass growth. Although the figure contains only the data set obtained with increasing relative humidity, same conclusion can be drawn if we regard the results from decreasing relative humidity. However, the magnitude of water deficiency is significantly lower (only 1.5) in the case of decreasing RH. From these data we can assume that beside inorganic components, other aerosol constituents play also important roles in the control of water adsorption and desorption. In Fig. 2 the average size distributions of main aerosol components are presented. Ammonium and sulfate ions accumulate in 0.5-1.0 and 0.25-1.0 μm size ranges, respectively, while high nitrate concentrations are measured in the coarse size range (1-8 μm). On the other hand total carbon (TC=WINSOC+WSOC; WINSOC: water insoluble; WSOC: water soluble) content of the aerosol concentrates in the 0.125-1.0 μm size interval, with a maximum in the 0.25-0.5 gm range. The relative share of WINSOC is the highest in this interval, while in other size ranges WSOC dominates. We also note that TC fraction, compared to the mass of other constituents, is high in the 0.125-0.5 μm size range.",
keywords = "Chemical composition, Hygroscopic properties, Regional background aerosol, Water uptake",
author = "I. K{\'a}d{\'a}r and A. Moln{\'a}r and E. M{\'e}sz{\'a}ros",
year = "2004",
month = "7",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
journal = "Journal of Aerosol Science",
issn = "0021-8502",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "SUPPL. 2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Study of the hygroscopic behavior of regional background atmospheric aerosol

AU - Kádár, I.

AU - Molnár, A.

AU - Mészáros, E.

PY - 2004/7

Y1 - 2004/7

N2 - In this work we applied the Atmospheric Inorganic Model to predict the water uptake of aerosol particles. This model was developed by S. Clegg and A. Wexler (Clegg et al., 1998). Since AIM considers only the inorganic fraction of aerosol constituents, these data are useful in the estimation of the effect of organic compounds on the hygroscopic growth of particles. In Fig. 1 the summary of predicted (by AIM) and measured water uptake of aerosol samples at 6 humidity levels (51, 64, 76, 80, 86 and 96% RH) are shown. From these data we found that predicted growth is 3.4 times larger than the measured mass growth. Although the figure contains only the data set obtained with increasing relative humidity, same conclusion can be drawn if we regard the results from decreasing relative humidity. However, the magnitude of water deficiency is significantly lower (only 1.5) in the case of decreasing RH. From these data we can assume that beside inorganic components, other aerosol constituents play also important roles in the control of water adsorption and desorption. In Fig. 2 the average size distributions of main aerosol components are presented. Ammonium and sulfate ions accumulate in 0.5-1.0 and 0.25-1.0 μm size ranges, respectively, while high nitrate concentrations are measured in the coarse size range (1-8 μm). On the other hand total carbon (TC=WINSOC+WSOC; WINSOC: water insoluble; WSOC: water soluble) content of the aerosol concentrates in the 0.125-1.0 μm size interval, with a maximum in the 0.25-0.5 gm range. The relative share of WINSOC is the highest in this interval, while in other size ranges WSOC dominates. We also note that TC fraction, compared to the mass of other constituents, is high in the 0.125-0.5 μm size range.

AB - In this work we applied the Atmospheric Inorganic Model to predict the water uptake of aerosol particles. This model was developed by S. Clegg and A. Wexler (Clegg et al., 1998). Since AIM considers only the inorganic fraction of aerosol constituents, these data are useful in the estimation of the effect of organic compounds on the hygroscopic growth of particles. In Fig. 1 the summary of predicted (by AIM) and measured water uptake of aerosol samples at 6 humidity levels (51, 64, 76, 80, 86 and 96% RH) are shown. From these data we found that predicted growth is 3.4 times larger than the measured mass growth. Although the figure contains only the data set obtained with increasing relative humidity, same conclusion can be drawn if we regard the results from decreasing relative humidity. However, the magnitude of water deficiency is significantly lower (only 1.5) in the case of decreasing RH. From these data we can assume that beside inorganic components, other aerosol constituents play also important roles in the control of water adsorption and desorption. In Fig. 2 the average size distributions of main aerosol components are presented. Ammonium and sulfate ions accumulate in 0.5-1.0 and 0.25-1.0 μm size ranges, respectively, while high nitrate concentrations are measured in the coarse size range (1-8 μm). On the other hand total carbon (TC=WINSOC+WSOC; WINSOC: water insoluble; WSOC: water soluble) content of the aerosol concentrates in the 0.125-1.0 μm size interval, with a maximum in the 0.25-0.5 gm range. The relative share of WINSOC is the highest in this interval, while in other size ranges WSOC dominates. We also note that TC fraction, compared to the mass of other constituents, is high in the 0.125-0.5 μm size range.

KW - Chemical composition

KW - Hygroscopic properties

KW - Regional background aerosol

KW - Water uptake

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=23344441575&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=23344441575&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:23344441575

VL - 35

JO - Journal of Aerosol Science

JF - Journal of Aerosol Science

SN - 0021-8502

IS - SUPPL. 2

ER -