Studies on the neurotoxicity of arsenic in rats in different exposure timing schemes

A. Szabó, Z. Lengyel, A. Lukács, A. Papp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Arsenic has long been recognized as human poison and, more recently, as an essential micronutrient. Here, the effects of low-level arsenic exposure on the central and peripheral nervous system functions were studied in rats, in a 4-8-12-week subchronic exposure scheme, and in a 3-generation scheme involving treatment of the parents and the offspring. From the rats, spontaneous and evoked activity of the sensory cortical areas, and compound action potential from the tail nerve, was recorded in urethane anesthesia, then dissection with organ weight measurement was done. Body weight gain of the treated animals did not differ significantly from the control. There were, however, dose-dependent changes in the weight of the liver and other organs. Latency of the cortical-evoked potentials increased in the treated rats in both schemes. The change was significant after long exposure times and in the higher dose groups. A shift of the spontaneous cortical activity to higher frequencies was also observed, with similar dose- and time dependence. Low-level arsenic affected the behavioral and electrophysiological functions in the brain, indicating that long-lasting arsenic exposure can result in manifest alteration of the central and peripheral nervous system. Consequently, arsenic-exposed populations may have a higher risk of behavioral and functional neurotoxic effects and potentially be an additive to the neurotoxicity of other environmental xenobiotics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-196
Number of pages4
JournalTrace Elements and Electrolytes
Volume23
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

Fingerprint

Arsenic
Rats
Peripheral Nervous System
Neurology
Central Nervous System
Dissection
Organ Size
Micronutrients
Poisons
Urethane
Bioelectric potentials
Xenobiotics
Weighing
Evoked Potentials
Liver
Action Potentials
Weight Gain
Tail
Brain
Animals

Keywords

  • Arsenic
  • Behavior
  • Cortical activity
  • Neurotoxicity
  • Rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Studies on the neurotoxicity of arsenic in rats in different exposure timing schemes. / Szabó, A.; Lengyel, Z.; Lukács, A.; Papp, A.

In: Trace Elements and Electrolytes, Vol. 23, No. 3, 09.2006, p. 193-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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