Studies on canine mammary tumours. I. Age, seasonal and breed distribution.

H. Boldizsár, O. Szenci, T. Muray, J. Csenki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence as well as age, seasonal and breed distribution of canine mammary tumours (n = 521) were studied at the Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the University of Veterinary Science, Budapest, between 1985 and 1989. In 39 cases of mammary tumour, blood plasma oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) concentrations were also determined. Of all dogs referred to the clinics of the University in 1985, 0.7% had mammary tumour. On the average, 104 +/- 9.3 cases of mammary tumour were recorded at the Clinic of Obstetrics per year. This number did not increase after the Chernobyl atomic reactor catastrophe of 1986. The age distribution of canine mammary tumour found in this study shows good agreement with earlier data of the literature: mammary tumour showed the highest incidence in 10 years old dogs. The incidence of mammary tumour kept increasing with age until the 14th year of life (as expressed in per cent of animals of identical age). The number of mammary tumours was markedly higher in the spring (April-May) and autumn (September). This seasonality was demonstrable in 11 to 16 years old bitches, too. On the basis of the blood plasma E2 and P profiles, 61.5% of the clinically anoestrous animals were found to be cycling. The strikingly high ratio of pulis among dogs with mammary cancer was suggestive of a breed disposition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-87
Number of pages13
JournalActa Veterinaria Hungarica
Volume40
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - 1992

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mammary neoplasms (animal)
Canidae
Breast Neoplasms
breeds
dogs
blood plasma
incidence
Dogs
Obstetrics
Incidence
animal age
bitches
Age Distribution
veterinary medicine
breasts
Gynecology
estradiol
progesterone
Progesterone
Estradiol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Studies on canine mammary tumours. I. Age, seasonal and breed distribution. / Boldizsár, H.; Szenci, O.; Muray, T.; Csenki, J.

In: Acta Veterinaria Hungarica, Vol. 40, No. 1-2, 1992, p. 75-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boldizsár, H, Szenci, O, Muray, T & Csenki, J 1992, 'Studies on canine mammary tumours. I. Age, seasonal and breed distribution.', Acta Veterinaria Hungarica, vol. 40, no. 1-2, pp. 75-87.
Boldizsár, H. ; Szenci, O. ; Muray, T. ; Csenki, J. / Studies on canine mammary tumours. I. Age, seasonal and breed distribution. In: Acta Veterinaria Hungarica. 1992 ; Vol. 40, No. 1-2. pp. 75-87.
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