A vénás betegségek mortalitásának feltünö növekedése Magyarországon.

Translated title of the contribution: Striking increase in mortality from venous diseases in Hungary

L. Molnár, T. Sándor, E. Monos, G. Acsády

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The statistical data of the World Health Organisation were studied from 1970 to 1990 to evaluate changes in mortality caused by venous diseases in 9 European countries and in the USA. The data were analysed in process and mortality rates in Hungary and in other countries were compared. In 1970 data based on general population of Hungary indicated medium incidence of mortality due to vein pathology (10.8/100,000) compared to the economically more developed countries. Unfortunately by 1990 mortality due to venous diseases almost had doubled (19.8/100,000). During this 20 years period mortality rates caused by venous diseases gradually decreased in the USA and in most European countries, e.g. by 80% in Austria and by 70% in Finland. Even the relatively high mortality caused by venous diseases in Switzerland (10/100,000) comprises only 50% of that demonstrated in Hungary. While the significance of modern thromboprophylaxis was recognised in the Western European countries and the USA in the early seventies, a delay of the introduction of prophylaxis with low-dose heparin was observed in Hungary. Socio-economic and nutritional causes could have been contributed to the high mortality rates caused by venous diseases as well. Further epidemiologic investigations focusing on venous morbidity factors and wide scale application of organised preventive programme are suggested.

Translated title of the contributionStriking increase in mortality from venous diseases in Hungary
Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)2727-2732
Number of pages6
JournalOrvosi hetilap
Volume138
Issue number43
Publication statusPublished - Oct 26 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Striking increase in mortality from venous diseases in Hungary'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this