Stratified dispersal and increasing genetic variation during the invasion of Central Europe by the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera

M. Ciosi, N. J. Miller, S. Toepfer, A. Estoup, T. Guillemaud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Invasive species provide opportunities for investigating evolutionary aspects of colonization processes, including initial foundations of populations and geographic expansion. Using microsatellite markers and historical information, we characterized the genetic patterns of the invasion of the western corn rootworm (WCR), a pest of corn crops, in its largest area of expansion in Europe: Central and South-Eastern (CSE) Europe. We found that the invaded area probably corresponds to a single expanding population resulting from a single introduction of WCR and that gene flow is geographically limited within the population. In contrast to what is expected in classical colonization processes, an increase in genetic variation was observed from the center to the edge of the outbreak. Control measures against WCR at the center of the outbreak may have decreased effective population size in this area which could explain this observed pattern of genetic variation. We also found that small remote outbreaks in southern Germany and north-eastern Italy most likely originated from long-distance dispersal events from CSE Europe. We conclude that the large European outbreak is expanding by stratified dispersal, involving both continuous diffusion and discontinuous long-distance dispersal. This latter mode of dispersal may accelerate the expansion of WCR in Europe in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-70
Number of pages17
JournalEvolutionary Applications
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Diabrotica virgifera virgifera
Central European region
Zea mays
genetic variation
maize
Disease Outbreaks
Eastern European region
Eastern Europe
colonization
Population
Introduced Species
invasive species
Gene Flow
effective population size
control methods
gene flow
Population Density
population size
Germany
Microsatellite Repeats

Keywords

  • Dispersal
  • Invasive species
  • Long-distance dispersal
  • Microsatellites
  • Range expansion
  • Spatial genetic pattern

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics

Cite this

Stratified dispersal and increasing genetic variation during the invasion of Central Europe by the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. / Ciosi, M.; Miller, N. J.; Toepfer, S.; Estoup, A.; Guillemaud, T.

In: Evolutionary Applications, Vol. 4, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 54-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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