A diabetes mellitus ossejtterápiája: Eredmények, lehetoségek és kérdojelek

Translated title of the contribution: Stem cell therapy for diabetes mellitus: Progress, prospects and challenges

S. Veronika Urbán, Judit Kiss, Virág Vas, J. Kovács, F. Uher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Curative therapy for diabetes mellitus mainly implies replacement of missing insulin-producing pancreatic β cells, with pancreas or islet-cell transplants. The limited supply currently available from cadaveric donor islets for transplantation, however, determines that researchers must explore alternative sources of graft material. Stem cells represent a promising solution to this problem, and current research is being aimed at the creation of islet-endocrine tissue from these undifferentiated cells. Both embryonic stem cells (derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst) and adult tissue stem cells (found in the postnatal organism) have been used to generate surrogate β cells or otherwise restore β cell functioning. Nevertheless, cell replacement therapies that are stem cell based will remain fiction rather than fact until we can efficiently and reproducibly ensure that stable, fully functional cells can be generated in vitro. It is also critical to ensure that any surrogate or regenerated β cells have perfectly regulated insulin production, which is essential for physiological glucose homeostasis. As in every emerging field in biology, early reports seem confusing and conflicting. Therefore, discrepancies between different results need to be reconciled. In addition, encouraging studies in rodent models may ultimately set the stage for large-animal studies. In this review, the authors provide insight into research efforts to overcome existing hurdles for this promising therapy.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)791-797
Number of pages7
JournalOrvosi Hetilap
Volume147
Issue number17
Publication statusPublished - Apr 30 2006

Fingerprint

Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Diabetes Mellitus
Stem Cells
Blastocyst Inner Cell Mass
Insulin
Transplants
Islets of Langerhans Transplantation
Adult Stem Cells
Embryonic Stem Cells
Islets of Langerhans
Research
Pancreas
Rodentia
Homeostasis
Research Personnel
Glucose
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A diabetes mellitus ossejtterápiája : Eredmények, lehetoségek és kérdojelek. / Urbán, S. Veronika; Kiss, Judit; Vas, Virág; Kovács, J.; Uher, F.

In: Orvosi Hetilap, Vol. 147, No. 17, 30.04.2006, p. 791-797.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Urbán, S. Veronika ; Kiss, Judit ; Vas, Virág ; Kovács, J. ; Uher, F. / A diabetes mellitus ossejtterápiája : Eredmények, lehetoségek és kérdojelek. In: Orvosi Hetilap. 2006 ; Vol. 147, No. 17. pp. 791-797.
@article{353480b8c4354f52bc923812b8f9b39c,
title = "A diabetes mellitus ossejtter{\'a}pi{\'a}ja: Eredm{\'e}nyek, lehetos{\'e}gek {\'e}s k{\'e}rdojelek",
abstract = "Curative therapy for diabetes mellitus mainly implies replacement of missing insulin-producing pancreatic β cells, with pancreas or islet-cell transplants. The limited supply currently available from cadaveric donor islets for transplantation, however, determines that researchers must explore alternative sources of graft material. Stem cells represent a promising solution to this problem, and current research is being aimed at the creation of islet-endocrine tissue from these undifferentiated cells. Both embryonic stem cells (derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst) and adult tissue stem cells (found in the postnatal organism) have been used to generate surrogate β cells or otherwise restore β cell functioning. Nevertheless, cell replacement therapies that are stem cell based will remain fiction rather than fact until we can efficiently and reproducibly ensure that stable, fully functional cells can be generated in vitro. It is also critical to ensure that any surrogate or regenerated β cells have perfectly regulated insulin production, which is essential for physiological glucose homeostasis. As in every emerging field in biology, early reports seem confusing and conflicting. Therefore, discrepancies between different results need to be reconciled. In addition, encouraging studies in rodent models may ultimately set the stage for large-animal studies. In this review, the authors provide insight into research efforts to overcome existing hurdles for this promising therapy.",
keywords = "Β cells, Bone marrow, Embryonic stem cells, Tissue stem cells, Transdifferentiation",
author = "Urb{\'a}n, {S. Veronika} and Judit Kiss and Vir{\'a}g Vas and J. Kov{\'a}cs and F. Uher",
year = "2006",
month = "4",
day = "30",
language = "Hungarian",
volume = "147",
pages = "791--797",
journal = "Orvosi Hetilap",
issn = "0030-6002",
publisher = "Akademiai Kiado",
number = "17",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A diabetes mellitus ossejtterápiája

T2 - Eredmények, lehetoségek és kérdojelek

AU - Urbán, S. Veronika

AU - Kiss, Judit

AU - Vas, Virág

AU - Kovács, J.

AU - Uher, F.

PY - 2006/4/30

Y1 - 2006/4/30

N2 - Curative therapy for diabetes mellitus mainly implies replacement of missing insulin-producing pancreatic β cells, with pancreas or islet-cell transplants. The limited supply currently available from cadaveric donor islets for transplantation, however, determines that researchers must explore alternative sources of graft material. Stem cells represent a promising solution to this problem, and current research is being aimed at the creation of islet-endocrine tissue from these undifferentiated cells. Both embryonic stem cells (derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst) and adult tissue stem cells (found in the postnatal organism) have been used to generate surrogate β cells or otherwise restore β cell functioning. Nevertheless, cell replacement therapies that are stem cell based will remain fiction rather than fact until we can efficiently and reproducibly ensure that stable, fully functional cells can be generated in vitro. It is also critical to ensure that any surrogate or regenerated β cells have perfectly regulated insulin production, which is essential for physiological glucose homeostasis. As in every emerging field in biology, early reports seem confusing and conflicting. Therefore, discrepancies between different results need to be reconciled. In addition, encouraging studies in rodent models may ultimately set the stage for large-animal studies. In this review, the authors provide insight into research efforts to overcome existing hurdles for this promising therapy.

AB - Curative therapy for diabetes mellitus mainly implies replacement of missing insulin-producing pancreatic β cells, with pancreas or islet-cell transplants. The limited supply currently available from cadaveric donor islets for transplantation, however, determines that researchers must explore alternative sources of graft material. Stem cells represent a promising solution to this problem, and current research is being aimed at the creation of islet-endocrine tissue from these undifferentiated cells. Both embryonic stem cells (derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst) and adult tissue stem cells (found in the postnatal organism) have been used to generate surrogate β cells or otherwise restore β cell functioning. Nevertheless, cell replacement therapies that are stem cell based will remain fiction rather than fact until we can efficiently and reproducibly ensure that stable, fully functional cells can be generated in vitro. It is also critical to ensure that any surrogate or regenerated β cells have perfectly regulated insulin production, which is essential for physiological glucose homeostasis. As in every emerging field in biology, early reports seem confusing and conflicting. Therefore, discrepancies between different results need to be reconciled. In addition, encouraging studies in rodent models may ultimately set the stage for large-animal studies. In this review, the authors provide insight into research efforts to overcome existing hurdles for this promising therapy.

KW - Β cells

KW - Bone marrow

KW - Embryonic stem cells

KW - Tissue stem cells

KW - Transdifferentiation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33745895287&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33745895287&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 16780187

AN - SCOPUS:33745895287

VL - 147

SP - 791

EP - 797

JO - Orvosi Hetilap

JF - Orvosi Hetilap

SN - 0030-6002

IS - 17

ER -